Creativity and Education Futures

Module titleCreativity and Education Futures
Module codeEFPM303
Academic year2019/0
Credits30
Module staff

Dr Kerry Chappell (Convenor)

Number students taking module (anticipated)

10

Description - summary of the module content

Module description

This module will develop your critical understanding of creativity and education futures, and their interrelationship. By exploring policy, practice and theory, you will reflect on how distinctive perspectives on creativity and education futures frame the ways in which practitioners, institutions and policymakers approach the development of educational provision. You will reflect on issues relating to pedagogy, learning, curriculum and assessment drawing on educational studies as well as sociology and psychology. You will develop critical consideration of how the digital revolution transforms issues in formal education systems, in nurturing creativity from personal to institutional levels.  There are no pre-requisite skills/modules.

Module aims - intentions of the module

The aim of the module is to explore various distinct theories of creativity and education futures, and the interfaces between these, and to consider their manifestation in practical settings. The module therefore includes seminar discussion as well as time spent in practical activities. Sometimes working with EFPM265 Arts and Educational Futures students you will reflect critically and creatively on issues relating to pedagogy, learning, curriculum and assessment and how these manifest differently in different contexts and disciplines. You will develop critical consideration of how the digital revolution transforms issues faced by educators and learners in formal education systems, in nurturing creativity especially in relation to changing visions of childhood, the role of student voice and alternative forms of schooling. Where appropriate you will be encouraged to relate these back to your own practice or that of those with whom you work/are connected in order that you relate ideas directly into the context within which you most actively practice.

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)

ILO: Module-specific skills

On successfully completing the module you will be able to...

  • 1. demonstrate systematic knowledge and critical awareness of theories and concepts in the field of creativity in particular as applied to education informed by your reading and professional practice;
  • 2. demonstrate systematic knowledge and critical awareness of theories and concepts in the field of education futures informed by your reading and professional practice;
  • 3. demonstrate an ability to evaluate critically theories of creativity and education futures for curriculum, learning, pedagogy and assessment;
  • 4. demonstrate an ability to evaluate critically policy and practice in creativity and education futures;
  • 5. demonstrate an ability to evaluate critically methodologies for exploring creativity in relation to education futures;

ILO: Discipline-specific skills

On successfully completing the module you will be able to...

  • 6. explore critically the multiple lenses through which creativity and education futures can be interpreted and developed;
  • 7. identify systematically and evaluate insightfully the influences of these perspectives in the broader literature and research;
  • 8. evaluate and critique ideas and concepts encountered on the course in the light of these different theoretical approaches;
  • 9. apply theoretical insights, through critical reflection, to your study;

ILO: Personal and key skills

On successfully completing the module you will be able to...

  • 10. demonstrate the ability to reflect independently, critically and creatively on professional practice;
  • 11. demonstrate the ability to plan for professional development in creativity and education futures drawing on this independent, critical and creative reflection on practice;
  • 12. demonstrate the ability to identify and critically discuss issues in creativity and education futures;
  • 13. demonstrate the ability to manage time and engagement in the context of masters level study that has a high level of independent study;
  • 14. demonstrate the ability to take the initiative in contributing collaboratively in interactive learning contexts; and
  • 15. demonstrate communication skills both oral and written and in on-line contexts.

Syllabus plan

Syllabus plan

The precise structure of the module varies each year according to the teaching team and student interest but in general around a third of the module’s sessions explore the theoretical landscape of creativity and education futures with particular reference to the notion of radical uncertainty and possible responses to this.The remaining two thirds of the sessions explore practical application of these theoretical perspectives and consider implications for individuals, institutions and systems.

Key issues include

-        How creativity can be understood, with a focus on ‘little c creativity’ from a wise, humanizing perspective

-        Changing childhoods:  guiding discourses and key principles

-        Approaches to working in partnership to nurture creativity including the roles played by cultural venues and    providers

-        Boundaries between education, arts and community in relation to pedagogy in particular

-        Learner voice and participation in educational futures

-        Transformative education and learner voice

-        Implications of responses to radical uncertainty for individuals, institutions and systems.

The module seeks to enable you to synthesise creativity, the arts and educational futures through active reflection on practice and theory. Independent, collaborative and peer to peer learning is also encouraged.

Core staff are joined by visiting lecturers who specialize in the applied areas such as arts-education partnership, student voice and participation; a visit is also made to a local cultural venue either in Exeter or ‘local’ to distance students around which critical activities and thinking occur (face-to- face or online as appropriate).

This module descriptor captures two modes of delivery: campus-based (C) and distance (D). In the Learning and Teaching section below there are two sets of numbers: one pertains to campus-based delivery and one to distance delivery. Students enrolled on the distance mode will be expected to undertake more independent guided study than those on the campus-based mode.

Learning and teaching

Learning activities and teaching methods (given in hours of study time)

Scheduled Learning and Teaching ActivitiesGuided independent studyPlacement / study abroad
29 (C) 15 (D)271 (C) 285 (D)0

Details of learning activities and teaching methods

CategoryHours of study timeDescription
Scheduled Learning and teaching26(C)4 recorded lectures (45 minutes each), 5 seminars (face to face or online 2 hrs each), 3 sessions based on practice (2 hrs each), 3 expectations to contribute to online debate with tutors + peers for 1 hr within a given week, 2 cross group online student presentations with tutor feedback and debate (lasting 2 hrs each)
Scheduled Learning and teaching12(D)4 recorded lectures (45 minutes), 1 session based on practice (2 hrs), 3 expectations to contribute to online debate with tutors for 1 hr within a given week, 2 cross group online student presentations with tutor and peer feedback and debate (lasting 2 hrs each)
Scheduled Learning and teaching3(C & D)Supervision by academic tutor, face to face or online.
Guided independent study81 (C)Directed study: preparation reading texts and preparing critiques for above detailed learning and teaching activities
Guided independent study60 (D)Directed study: preparation reading texts and preparing critiques for above detailed learning and teaching activities
Guided independent study35 (D)Online directed tasks to study key aspects of creativity and education futures
Guided independent study90 (C & D)Assignment preparation
Guided independent study100 (C & D)Self-directed study related to module including self-guided reading and reflective writing in relation to core module themes

Assessment

Formative assessment

Form of assessmentSize of the assessment (eg length / duration)ILOs assessedFeedback method
Paired presentation (either online or face to face) on an aspect of creativity and education futures 10/15 minutes presentation1-4, 6, 10, 14-15Peer and tutor verbal or online feedback

Summative assessment (% of credit)

CourseworkWritten examsPractical exams
10000

Details of summative assessment

Form of assessment% of creditSize of the assessment (eg length / duration)ILOs assessedFeedback method
Written essay offering critical, theory-based rationale for arguments made in formative presentation302500 words1-8, 10, 12,15Written tutor feedback
Reflective Portfolio and Commentary focused on professional practice (your own or observed practice of others)60Equivalent to 4000 words (there will be no word limit for the reflective portfolio – but the commentary needs to be between 2000 and 3000 words)1-11Written tutor feedback
Contributions to online discussions10500 words1-9, 15Written tutor feedback

Re-assessment

Details of re-assessment (where required by referral or deferral)

Original form of assessmentForm of re-assessmentILOs re-assessedTimescale for re-assessment
Written essay offering critical, theory-based rationale for arguments made in formative presentationWritten essay offering critical, theory-based rationale for arguments made in formative presentation (2500 words)1-8, 10, 12, 156 weeks
Reflective Portfolio and Commentary focused on professional practiceReflective Portfolio and Commentary focused on professional practice (your own or observed practice of others). Equivalent to 4000 words (there will be no word limit for the reflective portfolio - but the commentary need to be between 2000 and 3000 words)1-116 weeks
Contributions to online discussionsReflection on online discussion experience (500 words)1-9-,156 weeks

Re-assessment notes

If students are referred/deferred with regard to their contributions to the online discussions, then they will be asked to submit written reflections on their online discussion experience in this module (max. 500 words)

Resources

Indicative learning resources - Basic reading

Banaji, S. & Burn, A. (2010) (2ndedition) The Rhetorics of Creativity: A Review of the Literature, London, Arts CouncilEngland. http

://www.creativitycultureeducation.org/research-impact/exploreresearch/the-rhetorics-of-creativity-a-literature-review,58,RAR.html

Beghetto, R. A., & Kaufman, J. C. (2007). Toward a broader conception of creativity: A case for 'mini-c' creativity. Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts, 1(2), 73-79

Boden, M. (2004) The Creative Mind: Myths and Mechanisms, (2nded) London: Routledge

Chappell, K (2008) Towards Humanising Creativity. UNESCO Observatory E-Journal 1(3), http://

www.abp.unimelb.edu.au/unesco/ejournal/pdf/chappell.pdf

Chappell and Craft (2011). Creative Learning Conversations: Producing Living Dialogic Spaces. Educational Research 53(3), 363-385

Chappell, K., Craft, A., Rolfe, L. & Jobbins, V. (2009). Dance Partners for Creativity. Special Issue Research In Dance Education on Creativity. 10 (3) Nov 2009: 177-198

Chappell, K., with Craft, A. R., Rolfe, L., & Jobbins, V. (2012). Humanizing creativity: Valuing our journeys of becoming. International Journal of Education & the Arts, 13(8). Retrieved [28 Nov 2013] from http://www.ijea.org/v13n8/.

Cochrane, P., Craft, A., Jeffery, G. (2008). Mixed messages or permissions and opportunities? Reflections on current policy perspectives in education. In Sefton-Green, J. (Ed), Creative Learning. London: Creative Partnerships.

Craft, A. (2001). Creativity Across the Primary Curriculum. London: Routledge

Craft, A. (2005). Creativity in Education: tensions and dilemmas. Abingdon: RoutledgeFalmer

Craft, A. (2009), Changes in the Landscape: Creativity in Primary Schools, in Wilson, A. (Ed), Creativity in Primary Education: Theory and Practice, Learning Matters

Craft, A. (2008). Tensions in Creativity and Education: Enter Wisdom and Trusteeship?In Craft, A., Gardner, H., Claxton, G. (Eds). Creativity, Trusteeship and Wisdom: exploring the role of education. Thousand Oaks:Corwin Press

Craft, A. (2011), Creativity and Educational Futures. Stoke on Trent:Trentham Books

Craft (2012) Childhood in a digital age: creative challenges for educational futures. London Review of Education. Vol. 10, No. 2, July 2012, 173–190

Craft, A. (2013). Childhood, possibility thinking and wise, humanising educational futures, International Journal of Educational Research 61 (2013) 126–134.

Craft A., Jeffrey, B. & Leibling, M. (2001). Creativity in Education. London: Continuum

Cziksentmihalyi, M. (1996) Creativity, Flow and the Psychology of Discovery and Invention. London: Harper Collins

David Wood Consultants (2012). Creative Partnerships Change Schools Programme Synoptic Evaluation 2011. Newcastle: Creativity, Culture and Education.

DfEE. (1999) All Our Futures: Creativity, Culture and Education. National Advisory Committee on Creative and Cultural Education.

DfES (2000) The National Curriculum. (all subjects) London, DfES [and later revisions eg KS3 implemented 2008, and EYFS implemented same year]

Doherty,P. & Harland,J. (2002) Partnerships for Creativity: an evaluation of implementation. Slough, NFER Facer, K., Craft, A., Jewitt, C., Mauger, S., Sandford, R., Sharples, M. (2011).Building Agency in the Face of

Uncertainty. Outcome of ESRC Seminar Series on Educational Futures (2009-11) –

http://edfuturesresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Building-Agency-in-the-Face-of-Uncertainty-Thinking-Tool.pdf (16 Nov 2011)

Fishkin et al (Eds) (1999) Investigating Creativity in Youth: research and methods. Cresswell NJ: Hampton Press

Fryer,M.(1996) Creative Teaching and Learning. London: Chapman

Gardner, H. (1993) Frames of Mind. The Theory of Multiple Intelligences. London: Fontana.

Grainger, T., Burnard, P., Craft, A. (2006) Pedagogy and possibility thinking in the Early Years. Thinking Skills and

Creativity. 1(2), 26–38.

Inayatullah, S. (2008). Mapping Educational Futures. In Bussey, M., Inayatullah, S., Milosevic, I. (eds). (2008). Alternative Educational Futures: pedagogies for emergent worlds. Rotterdam/Taipei: Sense Publishers

John-Steiner, V. (2000). Creative Collaboration. New York: Oxford University Press

Leadbeater, C. (2009). We-think: mass innovation not mass production (2nd edition). London: Profile Books Ltd Moran, S. (2010) Creativity in School, in in K. Littleton, C. Wood & J. Kleine Staarman, The International Handbook of Psychology in Education. Bingly, UK: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

National Advisory Committee on Creative and Cultural Education (1999). All Our Futures: Creativity, Culture and

Education.  Sudbury, Suffolk: DfEE

Robinson, K (2001) Out of Our Minds. Capstone

Rolfe, L. (2011) The development of partnership based pedagogies.In Chappell, K., Rolfe, L., Craft, A., Jobbins, V. (2011). Close Encounters. Stoke on Trent: Trentham Books.

Sawyer, K. (2006) Explaining creativity: The science of human innovation. New York: Oxford University Press.

Sawyer, K. (2007) Group Genius: The creative power of collaboration. New York: Basic Books.

Scaltsas, T., Stenning, K., Constantine Alexopoulos, C. (2014) Creative emotional reasoning: computational tools fostering co-creativity in learning processes. C2Learn project: in draft project deliverable.

Sternberg, R.J. (1988) The Nature of Creativity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Sternberg, R.J. & Lubart, T.I. (1999). The concept of creativity: prospects and paradigms. In R.J. Sternberg (ed). Handbook of Creativity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

 

 

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Creativity and Education Futures

Credit value30
Module ECTS

15

Module pre-requisites

None

Module co-requisites

None

NQF level (module)

7

Available as distance learning?

Yes

Last revision date

01/09/2014