Photo of Dr Charlotte Bishop

Dr Charlotte Bishop

Lecturer

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01392 725371

Amory B104H

Dr Charlotte Bishop joined Exeter Law School as an Associate Lecturer in 2014 and is now a Lecturer (Education and Research) in Law. She graduated from the University of Kent in 2004 with a First Class Honours degree in Law (LLB) and the Kent Law School Departmental Prize for Special Achievement in Law and completed her doctoral thesis at Exeter University in 2014. 

Charlotte teaches on the core undergraduate module Criminal Law (LAW1003) and will be convening this course in Term 2. She also convenes the optional Level 3 module Gender, Sexuality and Law (LAW3011) and contributes to Law, Politics and Power (LAW3155). 

Publications

Bettinson, V. and Bishop, C. (2015). “Is the Creation of a Discrete Offence of Coercive Control Necessary to Combat Domestic Violence?” Northern Ireland Legal Quarterly 66(2) pp. 179-67.

Bishop, C. (2016) “The Limitations of a Legal Response”. In Bettinson, V. and Hilder, S. eds, Domestic Violence: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Protection, Prevention and Intervention (Palgrave MacMillan).

Bishop, C. (2016) "Rule that proof of domestic violence for legal aid purposes must be less than 24 months old declared invalid" Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law 38(3) pp. 330-332.

Research interests

Charlotte’s research interests are broad and inter-disciplinary, crossing the boundaries of socio-legal research into psychology, sociology, philosophy and criminology. She is currently researching how the harm of domestic violence, including harm that may be encapsulated under the new criminal offence of coercive and controlling behaviour (Serious Crime Act 2015), could be evidenced in criminal court proceedings. She is also currently working on recommendations for reforms to the pre-trial procedures and special measures provisions used in criminal proceedings where the witness is also a victim of domestic violence could be improved, based on the, insufficiently recognised, link between ongoing abuse and trauma.

Modules taught