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Dr David Blagden

Senior Lecturer in International Security

2410

01392 722410

Knightley SSI

David Blagden is Senior Lecturer in International Security at the Strategy and Security Institute within the Department of Politics, having joined the University in 2015. He was previously the Adrian Research Fellow in International Politics at Darwin College – where he remains an Associate Member – and a Research Associate at the Centre for Rising Powers, both at the University of Cambridge. Dr Blagden’s scholarly publications have appeared or are forthcoming in International Security, International Studies Quarterly, International Affairs, Foreign Policy Analysis, and International Studies Review, among other outlets; he is also the editor (with Mark de Rond) of Games: Conflict, Competition, and Cooperation (Cambridge University Press, 2019). He obtained his DPhil in International Relations at the University of Oxford, where he was funded by the UK Economic and Social Research Council, having previously completed his MA in International Relations at the University of Chicago and BA in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics at Oxford. He has won the Royal United Services Institute’s Trench Gascoigne Prize for original writing on defence and security, is a Fellow of the UK Higher Education Academy, and is also an Associate of the Corbett Centre for Maritime Policy Studies at King’s College London.

A member of the Chief of the UK Defence Staff’s Strategic Forum, Dr Blagden has worked in – and subsequently consulted for – the UK Cabinet Office, provided evidence for a number of Parliamentary Select Committees and HM Government policy reviews, and participated in the China-UK Nuclear Dialogue. He has also consulted for or briefed such organisations as the UK Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, US Strategic Command, the UK Atomic Weapons Establishment, the Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology, the Royal Navy, the British Army, the foreign/defence policy reviews of several UK political parties, the UK Defence Academy, and a number of think-tanks on both sides of the Atlantic. In terms of popular media contributions, he has provided commentary for the BBC, been quoted in the UK and US national press, and written for The Guardian, The Spectator, the New Statesman, The Conversation, and War On The Rocks. Prior to his doctoral study, he was an analyst with the London-based country risk advisory firm BMI Research (now part of Fitch Group). He is also a warfare officer in the Royal Naval Reserve, a past president of Oxford University Strategic Studies Group, and a former editor of St Antony’s International Review.

At Exeter, Dr Blagden has served as Politics’ Director of Undergraduate Examinations and subsequently Undergraduate Senior Tutor. He has also chaired the International Studies Association’s Postdoctoral Fellowship Committee. His research focuses on the following areas, and he is happy to consider applications for MPhil/PhD supervision on topics that fall within these and related fields.

  • The causes and consequences of the rise of new great powers
  • UK foreign and defence policy (particularly in the context of European geopolitics)
  • The security implications of economic globalization
  • Nuclear strategy (particularly deterrence, coercion, and disarmament/rearmament dynamics)
  • Navies and sea power
  • Domestic political and economic pressures on strategic behaviour
  • Realist international relations theory (particularly war causation, balancing theory, and offence-defence theory)
  • Philosophy of science and its implications for international-political thought.
     

Research interests

  • The causes and consequences of the rise of new great powers
  • UK foreign and defence policy (particularly in the context of European geopolitics)
  • The security implications of economic globalization
  • Realist international relations theory (particularly war causation, balancing theory, and offence-defence theory)
  • Nuclear strategy (particularly deterrence, coercion, and disarmament/rearmament dynamics)
  • Navies and sea power
  • Domestic political and economic pressures on strategic behaviour
  • Philosophy of science and its implications for international-political thought

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