Programme Specification for the 2013/4 academic year

BA (Hons) History and Politics

1. Programme Details

Programme nameBA (Hons) History and Politics Programme codeUFA3HPSHPSCD
Study mode(s)Full Time
Part Time
Academic year2013/4
Campus(es)Cornwall Campus
Programme start date

09/2012

NQF Level6 (Honours)

2. Description of the Programme

3. Educational Aims of the Programme

1. Offer an excellent Honours-level education in Politics and History that explores the interface between the disciplines.
2. Introduce students to a wide range of political and historical problems and the main analytical and critical approaches of the two disciplines
3. Produce graduates who can engage imaginatively in the process of understanding and analysing complex and sophisticated problems in the two disciplines by critical approaches that blend detailed and broad levels of analysis.
4. To develop students' independent critical thinking and judgement.

The aims of the programme are to:

4. Programme Structure

This Combined Honours degree programme is studied over three years full-time (or up to six years part-time) and is university-based throughout. The programme consists of three stages, and each stage is normally completed in a single academic year. Each stage of the programme consists of modules to total 120 credits, thus the entire programme consists of 360 credits. The credit weighting of a module is proportional to the total workload and one credit is normally equivalent to 10 hours of work. The level of a module, designated by the first number in the module code, indicates its position in the progressive development of academic abilities and skills across the programme. Level 1 modules are taken at Stage 1, Level 2 modules at Stage 2, and Level 3 modules at Stage 3. Each Stage includes 30 weeks of term-time, with two terms of eleven and twelve weeks and one of seven; teaching takes place over the course of 22 weeks in the first two terms.

Modules and other study components can be taken only with the approval of the School. Modules are not all available every year; options are offered each year at the discretion of the School and may be subject to change over the duration of the programme. A module may be taken only if the necessary prerequisites have been satisfied, if the timetable allows, and if the module or an equivalent module has not been taken previously.

5. Programme Modules

The following tables describe the programme and constituent modules. Constituent modules may be updated, deleted or replaced as a consequence of the annual programme review of this programme. Details of the modules currently offered may be obtained from the College web site

You may take option modules as long as any necessary prerequisites have been satisfied, where the timetable allows and if you have not already taken the module in question or an equivalent module. Descriptions of the individual modules are given in full on the College web site.

The full list of modules is available (with module descriptions) at: https://intranet.exeter.ac.uk/humanities/taught/mods by cat.php for history modules and http://intranet.exeter.ac.uk/socialsciences/modules.php for Politics modules. Constituent modules may be updated, deleted or replaced in future years as a consequence of normal programme development. Details at any time may be obtained from the websites.

Assessment at Stage 1 is formative and does not contribute towards the overall mark for the degree programme, although an overall pass is necessary for progression to Stage 2. The overall mark for the degree is calculated from the marks for Stages 2 to 3, which are weighted in the ratio of 1:2 respectively. All modules are condonable within the University condonable system.

Under the University’s rules on modularity, students may take up to 30 credits per year in another department within the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, or within another School. In this case, students would drop modules from the above list as follows:

Stage 1: Up to 30 credits from HIC 1300 and HIC1301 Introduction to World History 1 and 2 and/or HIC 1302 and HIC1303 Microhistories 1 and 2.

Stage 2: Pathway A one History Level 2 Option module; Pathway B 30 credits of Politics at Level 2
Stage 3: Pathway A, one Politics Level 3 module; Pathway B one History Level 3 module

Stage 1


All students must take HIC 1000 History Foundation (30/2) [30 credits, 2 HIC 1300 and HIC1301 Introduction to World History 1 and 2 (each 15/1); HIC 1302 and HIC1303 Microhistories 1 and 2 (each 15/1)); POC 1005 History of Political Thought: From Ancient Greece to Early Christianity (15/1); POC 1006 History of Political Thought: From the Middle Ages to the Renaissance (15/1); 30 credits from other modules at level 1 of the Politics programme.

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
HIC1000 History Foundation Course 30No
HIC1300 World History 1: Globalisation 15No
HIC1301 World History 2: Science, Environment and Sustainability 15No
HIC1302 Microhistories 1: Histories of Everyday Life 15No
HIC1303 Microhistories 2: Individuals, Communities, Identities 15No
POC1005 History of Political Thought: from Ancient Greece to Early Christianity 15No
POC1006 History of Political Thought: from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance 15No
Total Credits for Stage 1

120

Stage 2


There are two possible pathways for stages 2 and 3.

Under Pathway A, students take CHP 2000 Interdisciplinary Research Methods Project (30/2); POLM865 Modern Political Thought I (15/1); POC 2002 Modern Political Thought II (15/1); two choices from the list of History Level 2. Modules (each 30/2).

Under Pathway B, students take CHP 2000 Interdisciplinary Research Methods Project (30/2); POLM865 Modern Political Thought I (15/1); POC 2002 Modern Political Thought II (15/1); one choice from the list of History Level 2 modules (30/2); 30 credits from the list of Politics Level 2 modules.

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
CHP2000 Interdisciplinary Research Methods Project in History and Politics Pathways A, B30No
POLM865 History of Political Thought: Modern Political Thought Pathways A, B30No
POC2002 History of Political Thought: from Kant to Marx Pathways A, B15No

Optional Modules

Pathway A: two choices from the list of History Level 2. Modules (each 30/2).

Pathway B: one choice from the list of History Level 2 modules (30/2); 30 credits from the list of Politics Level 2 modules.

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
History (Cornwall) S2 Modules
HIC2001 Doing History: Perspectives on Sources 30 No
HIC2101 History Project 2 30 No
HIC2200 Public History Project 30 No
HIC2302 Development and Underdevelopment: Less Developed Countries Since 1945 30 No
HIC2309 Two Centuries of Celtic Literature 1810-2010 30 No
HIC2310 British Politics since the 1880s: Westminster and the Provinces 30 No
HIC2314 English Radical Politics 2: 1760-Present 15 No
HIC2315 Past Actions, Present Woes: History and Anthropogenic Climate Change 15 No
HIC2316A The Occult in Victorian Britain 30 No
HIC2317 The Cultures of the Sciences from the Renaissance to the French Revolution 15 No
HIC2319 Drawing Lines in the Sand: Britain and the Creation of the Modern Middle East, 1882-1923 15 No
HIC2323 Early Modern History 1500-1700: A Social History 15 No
HIC2324 Organised Crime in USA 15 No
CEH2000 Interdisciplinary Research Methods Project in English and History 30 No
CHP2000 Interdisciplinary Research Methods Project in History and Politics 30 No
HIC2321 Militarism, Authoritarianism and Modernisation: Japan from 1800 to 1945 15 No
HIG2000 Research Methods Project in History and Geography 30 No
HIC2004 The Power of the Celtic Past 30 No
Politics S2 Modules Cornwall Campus
POC2041 The Political Psychology of Elites 15 No
POC2049 EU Integration 15 No
POC2052 NGOs: Responding to Global Challenges 15 No
POC2055 Modern Political Thought: Rights, the Nation and the State 15 No
POC2074 The West and its Fears: Security Studies - Part Two 15 No
POC2076 China in World Politics 15 No
POC2081 Land, Fuel and Conflict 15 No
POC2083 The Research Toolkit for Politics and International Relations 30 No
POC2084 Foreign Policy 15 No
POC2085 Imagining the Good Life: From Agora to the American Dream 15 No
POC2086 Governing The Good Life: Contemporary International Studies 15 No
POC2087 Security Studies 15 No
POC2088 Understanding Israel and Palestine: One Land, Two People 15 No
POC2090 Violence, Conflict and Religion in the Middle East 15 No
POC2092 Comparative Government, Politics and Society in the Contemporary Middle East 15 No
POC2093 Understanding Israel and Palestine: Seeking Peace 15 No
POC2012 The Ethics and Politics of Humanitarian Intervention 15 No
Total Credits for Stage 2

120

Stage 3


Under Pathway A, students take CHP 3040, Interdisciplinary Dissertation (30/2); two choices from the list of Politics Level 3 modules (each 30/2); and one from the choice of History Level 3 Modules (30/1). Under Pathway B, students take CHP 3040 Interdisciplinary Dissertation (30/2); one choice from the list of Politics Level 3 modules; and two from the choice of History Level 3 modules  30/1).

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
CHP3040 Interdisciplinary Third-Year Dissertation in History and Politics Pathways A & B30No

Optional Modules

Pathway A: two choices from the list of Politics Level 3 modules (each 30/2); and one from the choice of History Level 3 Modules 

Pathway B: one choice from the list of Politics Level 3 modules; and two from the choice of History Level 3 modules 

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
Politics S3 Modules Cornwall Campus
POC3019 China in World Politics 30 No
POC3040 Dissertation 30 No
POC3034 The Ethics and Politics of Humanitarian Intervention 30 No
POC3049 EU Integration 15 No
POC3048 United States Field Course 30 No
POC3050 The EU policy process 15 No
POC3065 Secrets, Lies and Spies 15 No
POC3074 The West and its Fears: Security Studies - Part Two 15 No
POC3082 Gender, Violence and Development 15 No
POC3085 Imagining the Good Life: From Agora to the American Dream 15 No
POC3087 Social Movements in China 15 No
POC3088 Understanding Israel and Palestine: One Land, Two People 15 No
POC3090 Violence, Conflict and Religion in the Middle East 15 No
POC3091 Foreign Policy in the Middle East 15 No
POC3092 Comparative Government, Politics and Society in the Contemporary Middle East 15 No
POC3093 Understanding Israel and Palestine: Seeking Peace 15 No
History (Cornwall) S3 Modules
HIC3040 General Third Year Dissertation 30 No
HIC3300 Britain and the Telecommunications Revolution 30 No
HIC3301 The First World War: Interrogating the Myths 30 No
HIC3303 The Three Klans: Ethno-Politics in the 19th and 20th Century US 30 No
HIC3305 Society, Landscape and Environment 1500-1800 30 No
HIC3306 Thatcher and Thatcherism 30 No
HIC3307 The Politics of Nature: Sustaining the British Environment 1600 to the Present 30 No
HIC3308 Making a Nation? Australia since 1788 30 No
HIC3309 The Power of the Celtic Past: Memory and Tradition 30 No
CHP3010 Creating Sustainable Communities 30 No
HIC3312 Everyday Stalinism: Soviet Life in the 1930s 30 No
CEH3040 Interdisciplinary Third-Year Dissertation in English and History 30 No
HIG3040 Interdisciplinary Third-Year Dissertation in History and Geography 30 No
CHP3040 Interdisciplinary Third-Year Dissertation in History and Politics 30 No
HIC3311 Indigenous History, Colonialism and Identity in Western Canada 30 No
Total Credits for Stage 3

120


6. Programme Outcomes Linked to Teaching, Learning and Assessment Methods

Intended Learning Outcomes
A: Specialised Subject Skills and Knowledge
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

1. detailed knowledge of core subject areas in Politics and History, with a specialised knowledge in certain areas.
2. an understanding of a range of political theories, their significance and the major critical positions adopted towards them.
3. awareness of the variety of approaches taken to historical research; ability to evaluate the professionalism and scholarly value of historical texts; ability to evaluate the reasons for changes in historiographical approaches.
4. the ability to use different types of historical source; evaluate different and complex types of historical source; use primary sources in a professional manner.
5. Appreciate the different approaches to evidence and argument in the two disciplines and be aware of the potential of interdisciplinary work
6. Define a suitable interdisciplinary research topic and pursue it to completion.

Outcomes A1 – A4 are developed in Stages 1 and 2 of the programme through lectures and tutorials. Specialisation is developed in Stage 3 in small-group teaching. A5 and A6 are developed in the Interdisciplinary Research Project and the Interdisciplinary Dissertation respectively.

Outcomes A1 to A4 are assessed by a combination of written examinations, continuous assessment essays, oral presentations and group project work. A5 is assessed by project work and A6 by the dissertation.

Intended Learning Outcomes
B: Academic Discipline Core Skills and Knowledge
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

7. the ability to answer questions concisely and persuasively both orally and in writing.
8. the ability to evaluate critically theoretical models and competing views
9. awareness of the basic philosophical questions arising from academic research
10. comprehension of complex terminology and discourses, and ability to deploy such terminology in a comprehensible manner.
11. the ability to plan, execute and present an extended piece of original research

Outcomes 7 and 8 form the backbone of all modules taken at all stages, but the level of complexity develops according to stage.

9 and 10 are developed throughout the programme in lectures, seminars and continuous assessment. Students are encouraged to use the Stage 2 Interdisciplinary Project as a way of addressing 11 and concentrate on doing so in the Stage 3 Dissertation.

These skills are assessed through a combination of term-time essays and other assignments, oral presentations, project and dissertation work, and examinations. The criteria of assessment pay full recognition to the importance of the various skills outlined.

Intended Learning Outcomes
C: Personal/Transferable/Employment Skills and Knowledge
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

12. critical, creative and independent thinking.
13. confidence and flexibility in identifying and solving complex problems.
14. proficient use of electronic information retrieval and management tools; ability to access information from a variety of sources
15. effective interaction within a group.
16. effective self-management (autonomy, time management, self-motivation, self-reflection, seeking and using feedback, personal responsibility, self-criticism).

Outcomes 12, 13 and 14 are developed through the processes of acquiring subject knowledge and core academic skills (see A and B above).

Outcome 15 is developed through group work in parts of the syllabus (History: Foundation and level 3 modules and more generally in group discussions in academic tutorials.

Outcome 16 is developed by student progression through a learning and teaching programme that is gradually more self-managed, the personal tutor and Personal Development Planning systems.

Independent study forms a major part of our learning and teaching programme, most notably in the Stage 2 project and the Stage 3 dissertation.

 

 

Outcomes 12, 13 and 14 are assessed primarily through summative and formative essays and other assignments, assessed presentations, project work, the dissertation and examinations.

Outcome 15 is assessed directly in the History Foundation and History Level 3 modules, in assessed presentations.

15 and 16 are assessed indirectly throughout the programme, in that where modules require the development of these skills, it would be very difficult to achieve a good mark in the assessments without having developed such skills. 

7. Programme Regulations

University Regulations on the number of credits to be taken and at what level for each stage of the programme can be found in the Credit and Qualifications Framework.

Progression

Condonement is the process that allows you to be awarded credit (and so progress to the next stage or, in the final stage, receive an award), despite failing to achieve a pass mark at a first attempt. You are not entitled to reassessment in condoned credit. Regulations on condonement can be found in the Handbook for Assessment, Progression and Awarding for Taught Programmes.

Assessment and Awards

For undergraduate degrees assessment at stage one does not contribute to the summative classification of the award. Details of the weightings for each year of all programme lengths can be found in the Handbook for Assessment, Progression and Awarding for Taught Programmes.

Classification

Full details of assessment regulations for undergraduate and postgraduate taught programmes and the classification of awards can be found in the Handbook for Assessment, Progression and Awarding for Taught Programmes.

You can also read details of Generic Marking Criteria.

8. College Support for Students and Students' Learning

Personal and Academic Tutoring

It is University policy that all Colleges should have in place a system of academic and personal tutors. The role of academic tutors is to support you with individual modules; the role of personal tutors is to provide you with advice and support fo the duration of your programme, and this support extends to providing you with details of how to obtain support and guidance on personal difficulties such as accommodation, financial difficulties and sickness. You can also make an appointment to see individual teaching staff.

Information on the College Personal Tutoring system, library provision, ELE resources and access to College support services can be found on the College webpages for current students.

Student Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC)

SSLCs enable students and staff to jointly participate in the management and review of the teaching and learning provision.

9. University Support for Students and Students' Learning

Learning Resources

The University Library maintains its principal collections in the main library buildings on the Streatham and St Luke's campuses, together with a number of specialist collections in certain Colleges. The total Library collection comprises over a million volumes and 3000 current periodical subscriptions.

IT Services

A wide range of IT services are provided throughout the Exeter campuses, including open-access computer rooms, some of which are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Helpdesks are maintained on the Streatham and St Luke's campuses, while most study bedrooms in halls and flats are linked to the University's campus network.

Student Support Services

The University provides many support services including health and wellbeing, multifaith chaplaincy, family support, the Students' Guild and international student support.

10. Admissions Criteria

All applications are considered individually on merit. The University is committed to an equal opportunities policy with respect to gender, age, race, sexual orientation and/or disability when dealing with applications. It is also committed to widening access to higher education to students from a diverse range of backgrounds and experience.

Candidates for undergraduate programmes must satisfy the undergraduate admissions requirements of the University of Exeter.

11. Regulation of Assessment and Academic Standards

Each academic programme in the University is subject to an agreed College assessment and marking strategy, underpinned by institution-wide assessment procedures.

The security of assessment and academic standards is further supported through the appointment of External Examiners for each programme. External Examiners have access to draft papers, course work and examination scripts. They are required to attend the Board of Examiners and to provide an annual report. Annual External Examiner reports are monitored at both College and University level. Their responsibilities are described in the University's code of practice. See the University's TQA Manual for details.

12. Indicators of Quality and Standards

Certain programmes are subject to accreditation and/or review by professional and statutory regulatory bodies (PSRBs).

13. Methods for Evaluating and Improving Quality and Standards

The University and its constituent Colleges draw on a range of data to review the quality of education provision. The College documents the performance in each of its tuaght programmes, against a range of criteria on an annual basis through the Annual Student Experience Review (ASER).

Subject areas are reviewed every five years through a College Academic Audit scheme that includes external contributions.

14. Awarding Institution

University of Exeter

15. Lead College / Teaching Institution

College of Humanities (CHUM)

16. Partner College / Institution

Partner College(s)

Not applicable to this programme

College of Social Sciences and International Studies (CSSIS)

Partner Institution

Not applicable to this programme.

17. Programme Accredited / Validated by

Not applicable to this programme.

18. Final Award

BA (Hons) History and Politics

19. UCAS Code

VLC2

20. NQF Level of Final Award

6 (Honours)

21. Credit

CATS credits

360

ECTS credits

180

22. QAA Subject Benchmarking Group

[Honours] History
[Honours] Politics and international relations

23. Dates

Origin Date

01/09/2010

Date of last revision

01/04/2011