Programme Specification for the 2017/8 academic year

BA (Hons) Philosophy and Political Economy with Study Abroad

1. Programme Details

Programme nameBA (Hons) Philosophy and Political Economy with Study Abroad Programme codeUFA4HPSHPS34
Study mode(s)Full Time
Academic year2017/8
Campus(es)Streatham (Exeter)
Programme start date

09/2014

NQF Level6 (Honours)

2. Description of the Programme

This programme allows you to study and understand the contribution that philosophy can make to older and newer political and economic questions. You will be able to reflect on the role that philosophical notions such as ‘rationality’, ‘values’ and ‘norms’ play in other disciplines interested in the structure and functioning of human societies. You will also learn how to assess current politico-economical debates in light of the history of thought.The core modules introduce you to the central problems and methods of philosophical inquiry in combination with modules that build up specialisation in political philosophy, political theory and normative economics.

You will spend the 3rd year of the programme in a partner University on an Erasmus/Socrates exchange or other approved programme of study.

3. Educational Aims of the Programme

1. To produce graduates from the programme who are useful, productive and questioning members of society.
2. To produce graduates who are grounded in the main themes of Philosophy through a combination of modules which develop a deep understanding of some pervasive and problematic features of the world and of ourselves.
3. To produce graduates who are grounded in the main themes of Political Economy through a combination of modules which develop a deep understanding of the ways in which resource allocations are shaped by social and political institutions and practices.
4. To develop students competence in the specific skills required in Political Economy and in Philosophy, and in core academic and personal and key skills, including the completion of a research project.
5. To offer a wide range of choice within the programme of study, insofar as this choice is consistent with the coherence and intellectual rigour of the degree.

The programme aims:

4. Programme Structure

The combined honours programme is studied over four years. The first two years, and the final year, are university-based; the third is spent at a university abroad. Study is undertaken in four stages, one for each year of study. The programme is divided into units called modules. Modules have a credit rating of either 15 or 30 credits; 15-credit modules last for one term and 30-credit ones usually for two. Each stage comprises 120 credits.

If students wish to undertake their study abroad in a University which does not teach in English, they must normally take 30 credits from the Foreign Language Centre at stages 1 and 2 in the appropriate language. In doing this they would be deemed to have exercised their rights under the University’s modularity provisions.

Assessment at Stage 1 is formative and does not contribute towards the overall mark for the degree programme, although an overall pass is necessary for progression to Stage 2.

For June 2010 only, the weighting for calculating your degree will depend on the year in which you started your degree. Please refer Assessment Conventions which can be found at: https://intranet.exeter.ac.uk/socialsciences/student/undergraduate/collegehandbook/assessmentandfeedback

5. Programme Modules

The following tables describe the programme and constituent modules. Constituent modules may be updated, deleted or replaced as a consequence of the annual programme review of this programme. Details of the modules currently offered may be obtained from the College web site

You may take option modules as long as any necessary prerequisites have been satisfied, where the timetable allows and if you have not already taken the module in question or an equivalent module. Descriptions of the individual modules are given in full on the College web site.

The full list of modules in Philosophy (with module descriptions) is available at
https://intranet.exeter.ac.uk/socialsciences/moduledescriptions/index.php

(for stage/level 1 modules; for stages 2 and 3, replace 1 with those numbers as appropriate)

The Philosophy and Political Economy degree programme is made up of compulsory (core) and optional modules, which are worth 15 or 30 credits each. Full-time undergraduate students need to complete modules worth a total of 120 credits each year.

Depending on your programme you can take up to 30 credits each year in another subject, for instance a language or business module, to develop career-related skills or just widen your intellectual horizons.

The third year is spent studying abroad at a partner institution.

Please note that modules offered are subject to change, depending on staff availability, timetabling, and demand.

Stage 1


The first year gives you a foundational knowledge of philosophical, political, and economic theory and concepts. You will also gain important analytical techniques that will be useful across a range of subjects and research tasks.

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
PHL1002A Knowledge and Reality 1 OR PHL1005A15Yes
PHL1005A Evidence and Argument 1 OR PHL1002A15Yes
POL1016B History of Political Thought 2 15Yes
BEE1029 Economic Principles 30No
PHL1006 Introduction to Philosophical Analysis 15No

Optional Modules

  • 30 credits of Level 1 Politics options
  • BEE1015 Philosophy and Economy (15) credits can be taken as Politics credits.
  • 15 credit options from Philosophy.
  • BEE1015 Philosophy and Economics (15) credits can be taken as Philosophy credits.
CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
Politics Stage 1 Modules 2017-8
POL1001B State of Britain 15 No
POL1006 State and Society 15 No
POL1008 Introduction to Social Data 15 No
POL1017 Globalization of World Politics 15 No
POL1018 Facing the Challenges of World Politics in the Twenty-First Century 15 No
POL1019 Power and Democracy 15 No
POL1020 Politics in Europe 15 No
POL1025 Classical Political Thought 15 No
POL1026 Early Modern Political Thought 15 No
POL1028 Introduction to Strategic Studies 15 No
POL1041 Data Analysis in Social Science 15 No
POL1023 Politics and Economy of the Contemporary Middle East 15 No
Philosophy Stage 1 modules 2017-8
PHL1006 Introduction to Philosophical Analysis 15 No
PHL1007 Philosophical Reading 1 15 No
PHL1008 Philosophical Readings 2 15 No
PHL1009 Philosophies of Art 15 No
PHL1010 Introduction to Asian Philosophy 15 No
PHL1013 Philosophy of Morality 15 No
PHL1036 Foucault-Discipline and Punish 15 No
PHL1112 Philosophy of Film 15 No
Total Credits for Stage 1

120

Stage 2


In the second year you will advance your grasp of philosophical, political, and economic knowledge and methods through a set of compulsory modules. Optional modules enable you to develop specialist knowledge on a range of topics.

Compulsory Modules

For Philosophy - 2 of the 7 core modules must be taken

For Politics - POL2059 core module must be taken

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
POL2059 Political Thought of Modernity 15Yes
Philosophy Stage 2 core modules
PHL2010A Philosophy of Mind - 1 15 Yes
PHL2011A Philosophy of Nature 1 15 Yes
PHL2012 Social Philosophy 15 Yes
PHL2015 Body and Mind 15 Yes
PHL2016 Metaphysics 15 Yes
PHL2018 Philosophy of Language 15 Yes

Optional Modules

  • 30 credits of Philosophy OPTIONS (PHL****) coded.
  • 30 credits Economics OPTIONS (BEE2*** coded)
  • 15 credits of Politics OPTIONS (POL2***coded)
  • Further 30 credits OPTIONS from Philosophy, Economics and/or Politics
CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
Philosophy Stage 2 modules 2017-8
PHL2020 Virtues and Vices 15 No
PHL2021 Symbolic Logic 15 No
PHL2022 Sex and Death: Introduction to the Philosophy of Biology 15 No
PHL2026 Philosophy of Science 15 No
PHL2027 Feminist Philosophy 15 No
PHL2051 The Human Condition: Classic Readings in Anthropology 15 No
PHL2052 Epistemology 15 No
PHL2061 Philosophy of Law 15 No
PHL2075 Philosophical Readings 6 15 No
PHL2091 Philosophical Anthropology 30 No
PHL2096 Cyborg Studies 15 No
PHL2100 Knowledge and History: Theories of Scientific Change 15 No
PHL2108 Fundamental Ontology 15 No
PHL2110 Philosophy of Emotion 30 No
PHL2024A Philosophical Readings 3 15 No
PHL2025A Philosophical Readings 4 15 No
PHL2109 Philosophy with Children 15 No
Economics Modules S2
BEE2024 Economic Principles and Policy 30 No
BEE2020 Introduction to Econometric Theory 15 No
BEE2021 Policy Issues in the Global Economy 15 No
Politics Stage 2 modules 2017-8
POL2020 Contemporary Theories of World Politics 15 No
POL2027 The Politics of the World Economy 15 No
POL2046 The Economics of Politics 15 No
POL2047 American Politics 15 No
POL2050 Political Philosophy 15 No
POL2051 War and Peace in the Middle East 15 No
POL2052 Foreign Policy: Leadership, Power and Responsibility 15 No
POL2057 Security Studies 15 No
POL2059 Political Thought of Modernity 15 No
POL2060 Public Policy and Administration 15 No
POL2065 Environmental Politics 15 No
POL2077 Data Analysis in Social Science II 15 No
POL2079 Contemporary Public Debate in an Age of 'Anti-Politics' 15 No
POL2081 Thinking about Race: Perspectives from the Biological and Social Sciences 15 No
POL2082 The Changing Character of Warfare 15 No
POL2086 Strategy and Psychology in Foreign Policy 15 No
POL2091 Immigration in Western Societies 15 No
POL2094 Data Analysis in Social Science III 15 No
POL2095 From climate change to quantum theory: The future of international relations 15 No
POL2097 Behavioural Public Policy and the Nudge Agenda 15 No
POL2098 What is law? Jurisprudence from stone tablets to brain imaging 15 No
POL2099 The Politics of Social Justice 15 No
POL2100 Political Conflicts in Europe 15 No
Total Credits for Stage 2

120

Stage 3


Students will spend the third year of their studies in a partner university [on an Erasmus/Socrates exchange or other approved programme of study]. The year abroad comprises 120 credits and assessment is based on the credits gained at the partner institution.

Compulsory Modules

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
SSI3999 One Year study abroad 120No
Total Credits for Stage 3

120

Stage 4


The centre-point of the final year is the dissertation. This provides you with the opportunity to explore an area of interest and to demonstrate what you have learned over the previous years of your degree. You will also take up to three other specialist modules to create a programme of work fully reflecting your interests.

Compulsory Modules

International Political Economy [BEE3042]

PLUS EITHER

Option 1: Philosophy Dissertation

OR

Option 2: Politics Dissertation

CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
BEE3042 International Political Economy [Options 1 & 2]15Yes
PHL3040 Philosophy Dissertation [Option 1]30Yes
POL3040 Dissertation [Option 2]30Yes

Optional Modules

Option 1:

  • 15 credits Philosophy OPTIONS
  • 30 credits Politics and/or Economics OPTIONS
  • 30 credits Philosophy, Politics and/or Economics OPTIONS

OR

Option 2:

  • 45 credits Philosophy OPTIONS
  • 30 credits Philosophy, Politics and/or Economics OPTIONS
CodeModule Credits Non-condonable?
Philosophy Stage 3 modules 2017-8
PHL3013 Virtues and Vices 15 No
PHL3014 Symbolic Logic 15 No
PHL3018 Sex and Death: Introduction to the Philosophy of Biology 15 No
PHL3026 Philosophy of Science 15 No
PHL3041 Feminist Philosophy 15 No
PHL3051 The Human Condition: Classic Readings in Anthropology 15 No
PHL3052 Epistemology 15 No
PHL3061 Philosophy of Law 15 No
PHL3075 Philosophical Readings 6 15 No
PHL3091 Philosophical Anthropology 30 No
PHL3096 Cyborg Studies 15 No
PHL3100 Knowledge and History: Theories of Scientific Change 15 No
PHL3108 Fundamental Ontology 15 No
PHL3110 Philosophy of Emotion 30 No
PHL3024A Philosophical Readings 3 15 No
PHL3025A Philosophical Readings 4 15 No
Politics Stage 3 modules 2017-8
POL3051 The Media in Europe 30 No
POL3054 Nuclear Weapons in International Relations 15 No
POL3057 Biopolitics 30 No
POL3069 Globalisation and the Politics of Resistance 30 No
POL3076 Research Design for Dissertation 30 No
POL3078 Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics 30 No
POL3079 Money and Policymaking in the US 30 No
POL3080 The International Politics of Religion 30 No
POL3088 Forced Migration, Refugees and International Relations 30 No
POL3091 Immigration in Western Societies 15 No
POL3094 Data Analysis in Social Science III 15 No
POL3124 Anarchism and World Ordering 30 No
POL3125 The History and Political Development of Iraq 15 No
POL3126 Ethno-Politics: Theoretical Considerations and Case Studies 15 No
POL3129 Politics and Reform in the Gulf 15 No
POL3132 Globalisation and Democratic Politics: the End of the Nation State? 30 No
POL3136 Political Psychology 30 No
POL3154 The Politics of Climate Change 15 No
POL3168 War and its Aftermath: Interventions and Contemporary Conflict 30 No
POL3172 Political Participation 15 No
POL3174 International Security and US Foreign Policy 30 No
POL3175 Nationalisms in the Middle East 15 No
POL3193 Women in the Criminal Justice System: Law, Policy and Institutions 30 No
POL3194 Rethinking the Politics of Communities 30 No
POL3198 Revolution and Modern Political Thought 30 No
POL3199 Images of Democracy 30 No
POL3202 China in World Affairs 30 No
POL3203 Comparative Public Opinion 30 No
POL3205 Civic Engagement 30 No
POL3206 The Political Economy of the State 30 No
POL3207 Realism in International Security 15 No
POL3208 Maritime Power and Security in Global Politics 15 No
POL3212 Developments in British Politics: From Baldwin to Brexit 30 No
POL3214 Disrupting Western Hegemony: Insurgency and Counterinsurgency Post-WWII 15 No
POL3216 Democracy in the European Union 15 No
POL3089 Policy in Action 30 No
POL3180 Latin American Parties, Politics and Elections 30 No
POL3217 Feminist Political Theory 30 No
POL3218 Media and Politics 30 No
POL3219 Politics Through the Life Course 15 No
POL3220 The Politics of Democracy in Latin America 30 No
POL3120 War and Public Opinion 30 No
Economics Modules S3
BEE3027 Economics of Management Strategy 30 No
BEE3015 Econometric Analysis 30 No
BEE3032 Futures and Options 15 No
BEE3037 Industrial Organisation 1 15 No
BEE3042 International Political Economy 15 No
BEE3044 Money and Banking 2 15 No
BEE3045 International Economics 15 No
BEE3047 Public Economics 1 15 No
BEE3049 Behaviour, Decisions and Markets 15 No
BEE3052 Development Economics 15 No
BEE3053 Economic Growth 15 No
BEE3054 Advanced Mathematics for Economists 15 No
BEE3057 Labour Economics 15 No
BEE3058 Political Economics 15 No
Total Credits for Stage 4

120


6. Programme Outcomes Linked to Teaching, Learning and Assessment Methods

Intended Learning Outcomes
A: Specialised Subject Skills and Knowledge
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

1. Demonstrate understanding of the nature of philosophy and political economy.
2. Show familiarity with the basic analytical techniques of philosophy and political economy
3. Evaluate different approaches to philosophy and political economy
4. Define a suitable research project in the area and pursue it to completion

A1 is developed across all programme stages, moving from the broad discussion at stage 1 to the more specialised study at Stages 2 ad 4. A2 is developed through the introductory Philosophy modules and the combination of familiarity with basic Economics (A level or a core level 1 module), Introduction to Political Economy and the choice of basic Politics modules. 3 is present in some form in all modules but is developed in the compulsory stage 3 module BEE3042. 4 is developed throughout the programme in essay work and is taken further in the dissertation

The assessment of these skills is through a combination of term-time essays, ILOs 1-4
oral presentations, ILOs 1-4
and examinations (and, where applicable, Research Methods Project, Dissertation work). ILOs 1-4

The criteria of assessment pay full recognition to the importance of the various skills outlined.

Intended Learning Outcomes
B: Academic Discipline Core Skills and Knowledge
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

5. Gather, organise and deploy evidence and information from a variety of sources
6. Construct reasoned argument, synthesise relevant information, and critically analyse subject material.
7. Manage own learning self-critically
8. Show clear awareness of the basic questions arising from academic research.

These skills are developed throughout the degree programme, but the emphasis becomes more complex as students move from stage to stage. They are developed through lectures and seminars, written work, and oral work (both presentation and class discussion).

[These skills are assessed through
term-time essays, ILOs 5-6
assessed presentations, ILOs 5-6
and examinations. ILOs 5-6
8 is assessed throughout the programme but especially in the dissertation. 7 is not assessed

Intended Learning Outcomes
C: Personal/Transferable/Employment Skills and Knowledge
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
On successfully completing this programme you will be able to:
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) will be...
...accommodated and facilitated by the following learning and teaching activities (in/out of class):...and evidenced by the following assessment methods:

9. Undertake independent study and ability to work to deadlines.
10. Communicate effectively in speech and writing
11. Use information and communication technology (ICT) for retrieval and presentation of information
12. Collaborate with others to achieve common goals.

C1 is an essential part of the successful completion of the programme and is developed through presentations and written assignments. C2 is developed through essay and presentation work throughout the programme. C3 is developed through presentations and written assignments. C4 is developed to some extent in all modules, especially in group work at Stages 1 and 2, through interaction in seminars at Stages 2 and 3 and in discussion with tutors about essay work, and in response to criticism, both collective and individual.


(The skills in 9 and 10 are assessed in presentations, written work and examinations all modules. 11 is assessed by written work that requires the use of ICT for the retrieval and presentation of information.

7. Programme Regulations

University Regulations on the number of credits to be taken and at what level for each stage of the programme can be found in the Credit and Qualifications Framework.

Progression

Condonement is the process that allows you to be awarded credit (and so progress to the next stage or, in the final stage, receive an award), despite failing to achieve a pass mark at a first attempt. You are not entitled to reassessment in condoned credit. Regulations on condonement can be found in the Handbook for Assessment, Progression and Awarding for Taught Programmes.

Assessment and Awards

For undergraduate degrees assessment at stage one does not contribute to the summative classification of the award. Details of the weightings for each year of all programme lengths can be found in the Handbook for Assessment, Progression and Awarding for Taught Programmes.

Classification

Full details of assessment regulations for undergraduate and postgraduate taught programmes and the classification of awards can be found in the Handbook for Assessment, Progression and Awarding for Taught Programmes.

You can also read details of Generic Marking Criteria.

8. College Support for Students and Students' Learning

Personal and Academic Tutoring

It is University policy that all Colleges should have in place a system of academic and personal tutors. The role of academic tutors is to support you with individual modules; the role of personal tutors is to provide you with advice and support fo the duration of your programme, and this support extends to providing you with details of how to obtain support and guidance on personal difficulties such as accommodation, financial difficulties and sickness. You can also make an appointment to see individual teaching staff.

Information on the College Personal Tutoring system, library provision, ELE resources and access to College support services can be found on the College webpages for current students.

Student Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC)

SSLCs enable students and staff to jointly participate in the management and review of the teaching and learning provision.

9. University Support for Students and Students' Learning

Learning Resources

The University Library maintains its principal collections in the main library buildings on the Streatham and St Luke's campuses, together with a number of specialist collections in certain Colleges. The total Library collection comprises over a million volumes and 3000 current periodical subscriptions.

IT Services

A wide range of IT services are provided throughout the Exeter campuses, including open-access computer rooms, some of which are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Helpdesks are maintained on the Streatham and St Luke's campuses, while most study bedrooms in halls and flats are linked to the University's campus network.

Student Support Services

The University provides many support services including health and wellbeing, multifaith chaplaincy, family support, the Students' Guild and international student support.

10. Admissions Criteria

All applications are considered individually on merit. The University is committed to an equal opportunities policy with respect to gender, age, race, sexual orientation and/or disability when dealing with applications. It is also committed to widening access to higher education to students from a diverse range of backgrounds and experience.

Candidates for undergraduate programmes must satisfy the undergraduate admissions requirements of the University of Exeter.

11. Regulation of Assessment and Academic Standards

Each academic programme in the University is subject to an agreed College assessment and marking strategy, underpinned by institution-wide assessment procedures.

The security of assessment and academic standards is further supported through the appointment of External Examiners for each programme. External Examiners have access to draft papers, course work and examination scripts. They are required to attend the Board of Examiners and to provide an annual report. Annual External Examiner reports are monitored at both College and University level. Their responsibilities are described in the University's code of practice. See the University's TQA Manual for details.

12. Indicators of Quality and Standards

Certain programmes are subject to accreditation and/or review by professional and statutory regulatory bodies (PSRBs).

13. Methods for Evaluating and Improving Quality and Standards

The University and its constituent Colleges draw on a range of data to review the quality of education provision. The College documents the performance in each of its tuaght programmes, against a range of criteria on an annual basis through the Annual Student Experience Review (ASER).

Subject areas are reviewed every five years through a College Academic Audit scheme that includes external contributions.

14. Awarding Institution

University of Exeter

15. Lead College / Teaching Institution

College of Social Sciences and International Studies (CSSIS)

16. Partner College / Institution

Partner College(s)

Not applicable to this programme

Partner Institution

Not applicable to this programme.

17. Programme Accredited / Validated by

0

18. Final Award

BA (Hons) Philosophy and Political Economy with Study Abroad

19. UCAS Code

VL5C

20. NQF Level of Final Award

6 (Honours)

21. Credit

CATS credits

480

ECTS credits

240

22. QAA Subject Benchmarking Group

[Honours] Philosophy
[Honours] Politics and international relations

23. Dates

Origin Date

01/10/2002

Date of last revision

19/06/2012