Anthrozoology Residential (ANTM107)

StaffDr Fenella Eason - Lecturer
Credit Value15
Academic Year2017/8
ECTS Value7.5
NQF Level7
Pre-requisites
Co-requisites
Duration of Module Term 3: 1 weeks;

Module aims

The primary aim of the module is to provide distance-learning students on the MA Anthrozoology with the opportunity to participate in an immersive, interactive, face-to-face learning environment with their peers and established scholars. Through attendance at the residential and active participation in and contribution to academic and non-academic debates in Anthrozoology students will develop a good understanding of the interdisciplinary scope inherent to Anthrozoological research. The format of the residential will enable students who usually study at a distance to experience more traditional approaches to the dissemination of academic research and to engage directly with the theoretical, methodological and ethical issues encountered by practicing academics from a range of disciplinary backgrounds. Participating academics will present their research in the form of lectures, workshops and conference papers which will be followed by interactive, student-led group discussions.

ILO: Module-specific skills

  • 1. demonstrate a thorough engagement with and understanding of a range of multi-disciplinary approaches to human interactions with other animals
  • 2. discuss and critically assess the implications of approaching human interactions with other animals from a range of disciplinary perspectives
  • 3. show a good understanding of the different theoretical and methodological approaches which scholars studying human-animal interactions utilise in order to understand these varied interactions

ILO: Discipline-specific skills

  • 4. demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the ways in which different academic disciplines approach and analyse human interactions with other animals
  • 5. engage with and critically assess some of the current debates (theoretical, methodological, ethical) relating to human interactions with other animals
  • 6. make reflexive, theoretically informed comparisons between the work of practicing scholars from a range of academic disciplines and your own research and/or experiences relating to human interactions with other animals

ILO: Personal and key skills

  • 7. demonstrate critical, analytical thinking and synoptic skills
  • 8. demonstrate the confidence/ability to discuss in a critically analytical manner the arguments presented by other academics
  • 9. express complex ideas in a clear, coherent and reflexive manner through the formulation and dissemination of cogent arguments (both verbally and in writing)
  • 10. demonstrate the ability to participate as a productive member of a team during group discussions

Syllabus plan

The residential will take place over a period of three days, and will comprise a series of workshops, seminars and lectures run by academics from the University of Exeter and, where possible, appropriate external speakers.

Based on a previous non-accredited residential held at the University of Exeter in May 2014, the residential will be structured in a manner similar to that described below:

 

Day 1

09.00-10.00 Refreshments and networking

10.00-10.50 Welcome and introductory lecture by Programme director/MA tutors

11.00-11.50 Guest lecture by member of academic staff

12.00-12.50 Student led discussion

13.00-14.00 Lunch

14.00-14.50 Guest lecture by member of academic staff or PGR student

15.00-15.50 Guest lecture by member of academic staff

16.00-18.00 Student led discussion

Day 2

09.00-10.00 Refreshments and networking

10.00-10.50 Guest lecture by member of academic staff

11.00-11.50 Student led discussion

12.00-12.50 Guest lecture by member of academic staff

13.00-14.00 Lunch

14.00-16.00  Student led discussion

16.00-18.00 Film screening and discussion convened by member of academic staff

Day 3

09.00-10.00 Refreshments and networking

10.00-10.50 Guest lecture by member of academic staff

11.00-11.50 Student led discussion

12.00-12.50 Guest lecture by member of academic staff

13.00-14.00 Lunch

14.00-14.50 Guest seminar convened by member of academic staff

15.00-17.00 Concluding discussion led by MA tutors and goodbyes.

 

Academic content will vary according to staff availability and current staff research interests/projects. However, topics could include:

Biopolitics and wildlife conservation

Animal ethics

Multispecies ethnography

Advocacy and applied research in animal welfare

Visual representations of animals

Literary representations of animals

Historical representations of animals

Animals in the archaeological record

 

Because of the variable nature of the annual programme of the residential, the details of learning activities and teaching methods below are indicative, based on prior experience, but not a guarantee of the precise number of hours afforded to each activity year-by-year.

Learning activities and teaching methods (given in hours of study time)

Scheduled Learning and Teaching ActivitiesGuided independent studyPlacement / study abroad
201300

Details of learning activities and teaching methods

CategoryHours of study timeDescription
Scheduled learning and teaching12Academic-led lectures, papers, seminars
Scheduled learning and teaching2Staff-led film screening and discussion
Scheduled learning and teaching6Student-led discussions relating to lectures and seminars
Guided Independent Study30Non-assessed preparatory readings
Guided Independent Study100Research and writing of summative assessment

Formative assessment

Form of assessmentSize of the assessment (eg length / duration)ILOs assessedFeedback method
Participation in student-led group discussions6 hours1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 10Verbal feedback from MA tutors and peers
Participation in a group blog20 hours1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10Peer-assessed (via postings on ELE and/or blog on The Den (Anthrozoology group on Exeter's social networking site) and written feedback on the ELE discussion forums.

Summative assessment (% of credit)

CourseworkWritten examsPractical exams
10000

Details of summative assessment

Form of assessment% of creditSize of the assessment (eg length / duration)ILOs assessedFeedback method
A 4000 word portfolio review of the lectures/papers presented at the residential, incorporating a critical discussion of the theoretical and/or methodological and/or ethical issues raised by the different speakers1004,000 words1-9Written feedback
0
0
0
0
0

Details of re-assessment (where required by referral or deferral)

Original form of assessmentForm of re-assessmentILOs re-assessedTimescale for re-assessment
PortfolioPortfolio1-9August/September reassessment period

Indicative learning resources - Basic reading

DeMello, M. 2010. Teaching the animal: Human-animal studies across the disciplines (pp. xi-xix). Lantern Books.

 

DeMello, M. 2012. Animals and society: an introduction to human-animal studies. Columbia University Press.

 

Herzog, H. A. 2007. Gender differences in human–animal interactions: A review. Anthrozoos: A Multidisciplinary Journal of The Interactions of People & Animals, 20(1), 7-21.

 

Irvine, L. 2012. Sociology and anthrozoology: Symbolic interactionist contributions. Anthrozoos: A Multidisciplinary Journal of The Interactions of People & Animals, 25(Supplement 1), 123-137.

 

Kalof, L., & Fitzgerald, A. J. (Eds.). 2007. The animals reader: the essential classic and contemporary writings. Oxford and New York: Berg.

 

Kirksey, E. 2014. The Multispecies Salon. Duke University Press

 

Lloyd, N., & Mulcock, J. 2006. Human-animal studies in Australia: perspectives from the arts, humanities and social sciences. Australian Zoologist, 33(3), 290-294. http://www.rzsnsw.org.au/Volumes%20of%20RZS%20papers/2006%20vol33%283%29/Lloyd%20N%20Mulcock%20J%20Human-animal%20studies%20in%20Australia%20-%20perspectives%20from%20the%20arts,%20humanities%20and%20social%20sciences.pdf

 

Ogden, L. A., Hall, B., & Tanita, K. 2013. Animals, plants, people, and things: A review of multispecies ethnography. Environment and Society: Advances in Research, 4(1), 5-24.

 

Rose, D. B., van Dooren, T., Chrulew, M., Cooke, S., Kearnes, M., & O’Gorman, E. 2012. Thinking through the environment, unsettling the humanities. Environmental Humanities, 1(1), 1-5.

 

Shapiro, K., & DeMello, M. 2010. The state of human-animal studies. Society & Animals, 18(3), 307-318.

 

Smart, A. 2014. Critical perspectives on multispecies ethnography. Critique of Anthropology, 34(1), 3-7.

 

Module has an active ELE page?

Yes

Available as distance learning?

Yes

Origin date

20/05/2015

Key words search

Anthrozoology, MA, Applied Anthrozoology, Anthropology, Philosophy, Sociology, Environmental Sciences, Geography, Psychology, Residential, Interdisciplinary, Multi-disciplinary