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Act now to ensure animal welfare is at the heart of plans to introduce genome editing into farmed animal breeding, says independent ethics body

 The Nuffield Council on Bioethics, is calling on the Government to put animal welfare at the heart of plans to approve new breeding technologies in farming and food production, in a new report ‘Genome editing and farmed animal breeding: social and ethical issues’, published today.

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“Powerful” arguments from University of Exeter experts influence Post Office scandal inquiry

“Powerful” arguments by University of Exeter experts have helped to ensure the Post Office Inquiry will consider the “human actions” which led to workers being falsely accused of theft, fraud and false accounting.

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Clearer and more accessible local information needed on how councils are addressing the climate emergency, research by University of Exeter students shows

Local authorities need to produce clearer and more accessible information on how they are addressing the climate emergency, research by University of Exeter students shows.

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Long working hours and lone-working key factors leading to loneliness in farming, study shows

Long hours, working alone and a feeling of being undervalued and disconnected from the wider public are among the key factors which cause loneliness within the farming community, a major new study shows.

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Hospitality workers speak of “moral burden” of their job on new podcast exploring struggles of pandemic working

Hospitality workers discuss the “moral burden” of their job during the pandemic on a new podcast which explores the struggles of those who worked in restaurants, pubs and fast food outlets during the health crisis.

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Major new study to map South West’s food supply aims to improve opportunities for producers, processors and procurers

A major new project to map the South West’s food supply chains will identify opportunities to improve the system for people, place and planet.

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Experts urge Post Office inquiry to examine 'human actions' which led to workers falsely accused of theft, fraud and false accounting

The inquiry into the Post Office scandal must examine the “human actions” which led to workers being falsely accused of theft, fraud and false accounting, experts have said.

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Technology, law and creative experts join forces to share experience of regulating AI and deepfakes

Technology, legal and creative experts will join forces to discuss the opportunities and challenges of regulating AI and deepfakes.

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Lack of joined-up support from education and health is harming outcomes for young people with ADHD, a new paper warns

Lack of communication between child and adult clinicians and between clinicians and those in education can lead to educational underperformance and unmet health needs for young people with ADHD, a new paper warns.

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Urgent need for EU and NATO to be better prepared for legal threats, new study shows

There is an urgent need for EU and NATO members to be better prepared against threats in the legal domain, a new study warns.

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Government action needed to ensure insurance against major hacking of driverless vehicles, experts warn

Government action is needed so driverless vehicles can be insured against malicious hacks which could have potentially catastrophic consequences, a study says.

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Essay examines the history of petrochemicals and their impact on global geopolitics

All aspects of people’s lives are now bound to a “seemingly unlimited supply of cheap and readily disposable” petrochemicals, a new essay argues.

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Few parents aware excessive praise is not good for children’s learning, new study shows

Few parents are aware praising children too much can harm their learning, a new study shows.

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Experts to track impact of inspirational charity connecting old and young through reading

Education experts are working to pilot the impact of an inspirational charity which connects old and young through reading.

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Portrayals of same-sex couples in Strictly Come Dancing and Dancing on Ice as “bromances” is a missed opportunity to challenge assumptions, study argues

Same-sex dancing partnerships on reality TV shows have downplayed sexual and romantic intimacy on the dancefloor in favour of portrayals of “bromances”, a study argues.

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Despite the farming community facing significant mental and physical health challenges, more than 50 per cent remain optimistic about the future of their farm businesses

RABI’s Big Farming Survey results have revealed that despite the farming community facing significant mental and physical health challenges, more than 50% remain optimistic about the future of their farm businesses. 

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Rewilding efforts in England are “domesticated” and of a smaller scale compared to efforts in other nations, study argues

A unique “domesticated” form of English rewilding is now emerging, which is distinct from activities in other parts of the world where there are lower levels of human intervention, a new study argues.

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Report calls for urgent action to address alarming lack of diversity in climate change decision making less than a month before COP26 begins

A new report has revealed extremely low levels of ethnically diverse and equal gender representation in the debate around tackling climate change in Bristol.

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Compassionate communities key to preventing domestic abuse

New research by the Wales Violence Prevention Unit and the University of Exeter indicates people are more likely to take action against domestic abuse and its warning signs if they feel connected to their community.

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Study shows emotional toll faced by police staff analysing child sex abuse images

Police staff who have to analyse and categorise images of child sexual abuse cope with the trauma associated with their work by developing informal ways to support each other, research shows.

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Inspirational University of Exeter student nominated for Pride of Britain Award

An inspirational University of Exeter student has been nominated for a Pride of Britain Award after going on an epic “Tour de Full English” bike ride around the country in memory of his parents.

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New cohort of Exeter academics secure prestigious Alan Turing Institute Fellowships

The next generation of data science and artificial intelligence (AI) experts from the University of Exeter have secured prestigious fellowships from The Alan Turing Institute, it has been announced.

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Stark divides in parenting attitudes towards education revealed by new research

Middle class parents of school-age children are more likely than working class parents to ask teachers for information regarding their children’s education (61 per cent versus 46 per cent).

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Number diagnosed with autism jumps 787 per cent in two decades, study shows

The number of people diagnosed with autism has jumped by 787 per cent in the past two decades, a new study shows, likely an effect of increasing recognition.

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Digital evidence at risk of being missed because of fragmented police training and coordination, study warns

There is a risk of crucial digital evidence being missed or misinterpreted because of a shortage of adequate skills and knowledge in police forces, a new study warns. 

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New “SafePod” to help level up access to data for University of Exeter researchers

University of Exeter experts are now able to carry out more of their research on campus after new secure facilities were introduced to allow them to access confidential data in the city.

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More effective partnerships between medics and dance professionals needed to discover the benefits of dance to health, report finds

More effective partnerships involving medical and care staff, alongside professionals from the dance sector, are needed for experts to better understand how dance can help promote good health, according to a new report.

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Atmosphere and caring teachers at special schools more important to parents of children with SEN than educational standards, study shows

Parents are more influenced by the atmosphere and how caring staff are than academic educational standards or the curriculum when choosing a special educational needs school, a study shows.

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Innocent children feeling pressure to admit guilt to avoid prosecution, report warns

Children who have not committed a crime are likely to be admitting guilt and accepting cautions just to avoid prosecution, a new report warns.

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Focus on coercive control and gendered approach must be at the heart of efforts to address domestic violence and abuse, study argues

Moving away from a gender-neutral approach and a greater focus on the impact of coercive control should be at the heart of attempts to address domestic violence and abuse, a study argues.

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Giving performers copyright over their work could protect them from deepfake technology, study shows

Giving performers copyright over their work could protect them from being cloned by deepfake technology, a study says.

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Lack of global standards for Covid-19 certificates 'barrier to their successful implementation', report warns

The lack of global standards for coronavirus certificates is a key barrier to their successful implementation around the world, a new report warns.

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Men, Conservative Party supporters and Brexit-backers more likely to support the use of nuclear weapons, study shows

Men, Conservative Party supporters and those who wanted Britain to leave the EU, are more likely to want to retain Britain's nuclear deterrent, a study shows.

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Impact of citizen-led forensic efforts to find the “disappeared” in Latin America analysed as part of major new study

The impact of grassroots forensic practices led by families trying to find the “disappeared” in Latin America will be analysed as part of a major new study.

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Historical funding arrangements are the cause of significant inequities in special educational needs funding, study shows

Significant inequities in the budgets given to local areas to fund high special educational needs are largely the result of historical spending arrangements, research shows.

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Elite universities need to do much more work to simplify admissions and address major misperceptions among for applicants, new analysis concludes

Research highlights “huge complexity” in use of contextual admissions among Russell Group universities. Current university students meanwhile are likely to vastly over-estimate the proportion of student intakes who come from private schools.

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Research highlights “serious concerns” about strategy and conduct of Post Office lawyers during High Court case

Further investigations should take place to assess whether lawyers involved in a recent Post Office case in the High Court may have committed professional misconduct in their handling of that case, researchers have said.

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New research by The Prince’s Countryside Fund highlights the importance of auction marts for the social, health, and wellbeing of their visitors

A new report commissioned by The Prince’s Countryside Fund, and carried out by researchers from the University of Exeter, highlights how auction marts tackle social isolation and improve the health and wellbeing of their users.

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First academic research paper co-published on Instagram shows legacy of one of Algeria’s most influential modern artists

The first research to be simultaneously co-published in an academic journal and on Instagram shows the lasting legacy of one of Algeria’s most influential modern artists.

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HRH The Prince of Wales attends meeting at Tennacott Farm

As part of his annual visit to the South West, His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales attended a meeting at Tennacott Farm, near Bideford.

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Professor Sabina Leonelli elected to the prestigious Academia Europaea

Professor Sabina Leonelli has been elected to the prestigious Academia Europaea.

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Populist anti-foreign aid rhetoric has an impact on the public – but only among fans of populist politicians, study shows

Populist anti-foreign aid rhetoric works – but only fans of populist politicians are convinced by hostile messages about charity abroad, a new study shows. Those who distrust populist politicians are significantly less susceptible to these messages.

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Greater investment and innovation in educating children about environmental issues needed to help future generations respond to the climate emergency, experts urge

Environmental education provision needs greater investment and innovation if future generations are to be able to respond fully to the climate emergency, experts have said.

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Pupils lost a third of learning time during pandemic year - differences in learning loss between nations show effect of variation in lockdowns

Pupils across the UK have lost out on a third of their learning time since the pandemic started, even once learning at home is taken into account, new research finds.

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The University of Exeter joins Preferred Partner Scheme

The Aziz Foundation is pleased to announce that it will be offering Master’s scholarships at The University of Exeter for exceptional students, from a British Muslim background, looking to progress onto postgraduate study.

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Guild Teaching Awards 2021

We’re delighted to announce the winners and college shortlist for the Teaching Awards 2021.

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Experts issue “urgent call” for new international forum to help people displaced within their own country

Experts have issued an “urgent call” for a new international forum to help people who are displaced within their own country.

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Major new research project aims to address social mobility issues blighting young lives in the South West

A major new research project will seek to highlight and address the social mobility issues blighting young lives in the South West.

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Public opinion surveys on vaccine hesitancy can help predict where vaccine uptake is likely to be lower, study shows

Public opinion surveys could be used more widely to understand regional variation in vaccine hesitancy, experts have recommended.

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Teachers want to encourage children to take a public stand against climate change

More than half of teachers in England are in favour of teaching children to take direct action against climate change and participate in related civil disobedience, according to a new survey.

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Religious participation makes both old and young more likely to trust their neighbours and donate to charity, study shows

“Boomers” and “millennials” who go to church are more likely to trust their neighbours and donate to charity, according to a new study.

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Urgent need to reform image of farming to prevent “disastrous” labour shortages, report warns

There is an urgent need to change the image of farming in order to prevent “disastrous” agriculture labour shortages, a new report warns.

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Impact of COVID-19 on weddings reinforces need for marriage law reforms, experts say

Coronavirus disruption to weddings has highlighted the complexity and antiquity of marriage law and reinforced the need for reform, a new study shows.

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New support for teachers to help pupils manage emotions and have their voices heard when parents separate

Experts have designed new lesson plans to help pupils manage the emotions they may feel when parents separate and ensure their voices are heard during this difficult time.

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Tasks set in science lessons influence children’s writing development, study finds

Tasks set in science lessons are helping children to develop their mastery of grammar, research shows.

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Green Thinking podcasts bring new approach to climate questions

A new podcast series hosted by a University of Exeter academic explores issues linking climate challenge and society, in conversation with some of the UK’s leading researchers.

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People who falsely believe they are able to identify false news are more likely to fall victim to it, study shows

People who falsely believe they are able to identify false news are more likely to fall victim to it, a new study shows.

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Legislation should ensure Covid-19 health status certificates are only used during the pandemic, study argues

Lawmakers around the world should include “sunset clauses” in legislation to ensure Covid-19 health status certificates are only used during the pandemic, a new study says.

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Exeter pupils need encouragement more than catch-up sessions, survey suggests

Exeter pupils need encouragement, reassurance and mental health support, not a focus on “catching-up” or “lost learning”, a survey of children, parents and teachers in the city suggests.

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Tackling attempts by kleptocrats to launder reputations must be a priority for universities, report warns

Universities must make tackling attempts by kleptocrats to use higher education to launder reputations a greater priority, a new report warns.

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Cornwall EU leave voters wanted to 'take back control' and express concern about immigration, new research shows

Leave voters in Cornwall wanted to exit the EU to “take back control” and express concern about immigration.

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Global leaders’ personalities influenced their response to the coronavirus pandemic, study shows

The different personalities of global leaders have influenced their reaction to the coronavirus pandemic, a new study shows.

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Extreme weather affecting UK agriculture – but adapting to changing climate a challenge for many farmers, study shows

Extreme weather is harming UK agriculture – but many farmers have not yet made adapting to the effects of the climate emergency a priority, a new study shows.

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Growth of satire during “age of politeness” saw worries ridicule could lead to abuse, research shows

The explosion of satire in the Georgian period saw philosophers worry mockery could lead to abuse, research shows.

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People in France, Germany, and Sweden split over the lifting of restrictions for vaccinated citizens, study shows

Coronavirus restrictions should be lifted for those vaccinated, 30 to 40 per cent of people in France, Germany and Sweden have said.

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Children likely to be pleading guilty when innocent, study argues

Young people need additional support and protection in the criminal justice system because they are more susceptible to pleading guilty when innocent, a new study argues.  

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Positive uptake of the Big Farming Survey will define future support

RABI extends its thanks to the farming sector as the largest ever research project into the health and wellbeing of farming people throughout England and Wales concludes its first stage.

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Unreliable witness testimony biggest cause of miscarriages of justice over the past 50 years, study suggests

Unreliable witness testimony has been the biggest cause of miscarriages of justice over the past half century, a major new study suggests.

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Majority of election officials concerned about low voter turnout, study shows

A majority of election administrators are concerned about low voter turnout, particularly in contests for Police and Crime Commissioners, a study shows.

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Have your say about lockdown learning in major new survey of Exeter families and teachers

Parents, children and teachers in Exeter are being asked to share their experiences of lockdown learning as part of a new survey.

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Major new study will investigate causes of global persistent inequality in female electoral representation

A major new study will shed new light on why there are fewer female than male politicians around the world, and if sexism, discrimination and violence are to blame.

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Making spaces on the high street for clothing repairs could transform “make do and mend” into the “hipster’s’ equivalent of a spa day”, experts say

Making space in high street shops for people to repair clothes could mend the damage caused by fast fashion and transform sewing into a wellbeing activity, experts say.

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Religion played an important role in Britain voting to leave the EU in 2016, research shows

Faith played an “important and under-appreciated role” in the UK’s choice to leave Europe, with Anglicans more likely to back Brexit, a major new study shows.

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European rules to protect consumers using digital services such as social media need “significant changes”, experts warn

European laws protecting consumers using digital services such as social media and search engines need “significant changes”, experts have warned.

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National Tutoring Programme will need to support ten times current numbers of pupils to reach all disadvantaged children, experts warn

The Government’s National Tutoring Programme to help children affected by pandemic school closures will need to reach at least ten times the current numbers of pupils being supported to help all disadvantaged young people, experts have warned.

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University of Exeter expert to join the Pensions for Purpose Paris Alignment Forum

A University of Exeter academic will participate in a new forum set up by experts to explore the role of pension funds, asset managers and thought leaders in helping firms to cut greenhouse gas and carbon emissions.

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University of Exeter wins prestigious grant to showcase the contribution of arts and humanities research through the Covid-19 pandemic

The University of Exeter has been awarded £200,000* by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) to take arts and humanities research beyond higher education to drive social change. 

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Centre-right MEPs less cohesive on votes about EU fundamental values during Fidesz era, study shows

Centre-right MEPs voted less cohesively on issues about EU fundamental values when Fidesz was a member of the EPP group, a new study shows.

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University of Exeter expert advising on legal reforms to better protect people from abuse using intimate images

A University of Exeter expert is advising on legal reforms designed to better protect people from abuse using intimate images. 

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Being highly educated not a curb to bigger families for religious women, study suggests

The trend for highly-educated women to have fewer children isn’t seen among those who are religious, new analysis suggests.

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Couples who married in alternative wedding ceremonies needed to help with new research project

Couples who chose to marry in an alternative wedding ceremony can take part in a major new research project which will shed light on the demand for non-legal marriage services in England and Wales.

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University of Exeter Law Society nominated for three prestigious awards

The University of Exeter’s Law Society has been nominated for three prestigious awards for work to create opportunities for students.

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Exeter subject success in influential league rankings

The University of Exeter’s subjects from across disciplines have been recognised as being amongst the very best in the world, according to the latest influential global league table

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Database of miscarriages of justice launched as part of new evidence-based justice initiative

A database showing miscarriages of justice that have occurred over the past 50 years has been launched as part of a new initiative aimed at using evidence from psychology and data science to improve the legal system.

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From taking exams in Afghanistan to training to be a teacher during a pandemic – a new type of tour of duty for University of Exeter student

Royal Marine Dave Mason was so determined to fulfil his dream of becoming a teacher he sat exams while serving in Afghanistan.

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Using human rights laws may be most effective way of harnessing international legislation to protect the Amazon, study shows

Using laws governing human rights may be the best way of harnessing international legislation and tribunals to protect the Amazon, a new study shows.

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Far-right political parties are ambivalent rather than sceptical about Europe, analysis shows

Far right political parties have acted in an ambivalent rather than overtly sceptical way towards Europe, analysis shows.

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Leading experts in public health and social mobility made fellows of the Academy of Social Sciences

Leading University of Exeter experts in public health and social mobility have been made fellows of the prestigious Academy of Social Sciences.

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Farmer mental health hit during Covid focus of new research

Farmers mental health and resilience and the effect of the Covid-19 pandemic will be the focus of a major new research project.

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Methods of recording, investigating and learning from deaths following use of force by the police across Europe can be critically lacking, new report warns

Methods of recording, investigating and learning from deaths following use of force by the police across Europe can be “lacking in critical respects”, a new report warns.

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People would prefer to vote online than by post in UK 2021 elections during pandemic, research shows

More people would prefer to vote online than by post during the bumper set of covid-disrupted local, mayoral and national elections this year, research shows.

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Health and wellbeing benefits of walking on the South West Coast Path valued at over £75 million per year

Latest research has calculated health and wellbeing benefits of over £75 million for people walking Britain’s longest National Trail. The figures were produced as part of a report published today that assesses the health and wellbeing benefits of the South West Coast Path.

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2021 assessment changes mean teachers need “extensive support” to avoid unconscious bias, experts urge

The cancellation of 2021 exams mean teachers need “extensive guidance” on how to minimise the threat of unconscious bias while assessing pupils’ work, experts have said.

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Learn about national and regional social mobility challenges from leading University of Exeter expert

The stark social mobility challenges facing the South West – and the UK – will be the focus of an event led by a leading expert on the issue.

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ISIS and the Taliban use different strategies to appeal to women in English-language magazines, study shows

ISIS, Al Qaeda, and the Taliban use their English-language magazines to encourage women to support jihad in different ways, according to new research.

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“Attitude of gratitude” keeps older people in Japan feeling hopeful as they age, study shows

Older people in Japan have an “attitude of gratitude” which keeps them feeling hopeful despite the challenges of aging, a new study says.

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‘Fake News Law’ needed to protect the public against the spread of fake news, experts argue

There is an urgent need to regulate fake news, and even criminalising the deliberate creation and spread of false information should not be ruled out, legal experts have warned.

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Take 15 minutes to complete the Big Farming Survey

RABI has launched the largest ever survey of farming people in England and Wales, with a target of achieving 26,000 responses. 

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BAME parliamentary candidates not picked to fight ‘winnable seats’ in areas with less tolerance towards diversity, study suggests

Political parties are increasingly likely to avoid selecting ethnic minority candidates for ‘winnable’ constituencies at General Elections in areas where there are less tolerant attitudes toward diversity, study suggests.

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Statement of support from the University of Exeter on the importance of languages

The University of Exeter is delighted to endorse and support the international call to action recently released by the British Academy and partners under the title The Importance of Languages in Global Context

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Poorer pupils most likely to be away from school at the end of 2020, researchers tracking coronavirus learning loss have found

Poorer pupils were most likely to be away from school at the end of 2020, experts analysing the learning loss caused by coronavirus have found.

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People back coronavirus restrictions but think autumn local lockdowns were mismanaged by the Government, survey shows

There is widespread public support for coronavirus restrictions, but most people believe local lockdowns this autumn were mismanaged by the Government, a new survey shows.

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Major changes to interpretation of the Human Rights Act needed to protect people during arrest and detention, research argues

Major changes to the way courts interpret the Human Rights Act are necessary so the legislation does more to protect people detained because of the expansion of police powers, a new study says.

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Legal reforms needed to protect people from “deepfake” and AI intellectual property theft, expert warns

Legal reforms are needed to protect people from their image being copied by “deepfake” or AI technology, an expert has warned.

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Major new project will support global implementation of open science

A major new research project will support open science implementation around the world.

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Funding awarded to help more people in Wales tackle rising cases of domestic abuse

Delivery drivers, neighbours and colleagues in virtual meetings could help tackle rising domestic abuse with the right training and support in a world changed by COVID-19.

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Digital health passports should not be rolled out on a mass basis until COVID-19 vaccines are available to all, report warns

Digital health passports should not be introduced on a mass basis until coronavirus tests are available and affordable to everyone in the country, report warns

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The distress caused by the Coronavirus pandemic means parents should maintain the “vital tonic” of the Father Christmas myth for children this year, psychologist urges

Parents agonise about how to handle difficult questions about Father Christmas when children grow up, but the coronavirus pandemic means it could be damaging to be totally honest this year.

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Reform of UK company takeover rules would boost productivity and investment, Parliamentarians told

Reforms to company takeover rules could boost UK productivity, increase investment opportunities and limit inefficient management, politicians have been told.

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Experts urge new campaign to stop acrimonious family court battles during relationship breakdowns

A permanent change in cultural attitudes is needed to steer separating parents away from acrimonious legal proceedings during family breakdowns, experts have said. 

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Academics in favour of universities refusing funding from nations connected to human rights concerns, survey shows

Academics are in favour of universities refusing funding from foreign organisations and individuals or nations linked with human rights concerns, a new survey of over 1,500 social scientists based in UK universities shows.

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Widespread public support for job guarantees and exam reform, survey shows

There is strong public support for job guarantees and reforms to exams in 2021 to help young people affected by the coronavirus pandemic, a new survey shows.

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Experts urge review of maths teaching after study shows children lack spatial reasoning skills

Mathematics teaching needs to be rethought because children’s spatial reasoning skills are not developed enough, a new study says.

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University of Exeter experts lead major research project into farmer wellbeing

University of Exeter experts are leading a major new study to better understand the mental and physical wellbeing issues facing agricultural workers.

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One in 10 young people lost their job during covid-19 pandemic, new survey shows

More than one in 10 people aged 16 to 25 have lost their job, and just under six in 10 have seen their earnings fall since the coronavirus pandemic began, new research shows. 

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Launch of new neurodevelopmental and neurodiversity network

A new regional network between the GW4 universities of Bath, Bristol, Cardiff and Exeter has launched which will focus on research into neurodiversity and conditions such as ADHD and autism

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Online church services prove popular with rural congregations during pandemic, new study shows

Online church services have proved popular with rural communities during the pandemic, a new study shows.

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Former rebel groups become more moderate after gaining political power in nations with democracy, research shows

Former rebel groups who transform into political parties have adopted a moderate stance after gaining power in more democratic political systems, a study shows.

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University of Exeter expert appointed to prestigious economic committee

A University of Exeter expert has been appointed to be a member of a prestigious economic network.

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Third of people want coronavirus lockdown rule-breakers to be jailed, survey shows

A third of people are in favour of prison sentences for those who break coronavirus lockdown rules, according to a major new survey.

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New code of conduct calls for universities to do more to protect academic freedom in their international partnerships

UK higher education institutions should be more transparent about their international partnerships and more accountable to their staff and students in order to protect academic freedom, experts have said.

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Less than a fifth of farmers plan to fully retire, new university study finds

Less than a fifth of farmers plan on fully retiring and many do not discuss their later life plans with loved ones, according to a new study from the University of Exeter in collaboration with NFU Mutual.

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Fifth of people experiencing mental health issues due to coronavirus, major new survey shows

A fifth of people have reported experiencing mental health issues and a third of people are feeling isolated because of the coronavirus pandemic, a major new survey shows.

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Exeter researchers awarded prestigious fellowships to tackle issues from food insecurity to autism

Five researchers at the University of Exeter have been awarded prestigious fellowships to tackle key issues from food and housing insecurities to autism diagnosis.

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Introducing third legal gender option popular with majority of trans and non-binary people, research shows

Introducing a third legal gender option is popular with the majority of trans and non-binary people, research suggests.

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Fundamental reset of society needed to prevent decline in social mobility in the post-Covid era, experts warn

A fundamental reset of society is needed to avert an unprecedented decline in social mobility in the post-Covid era, leading experts have warned.

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New education “hubs” for Deaf children needed to replace social spaces lost when specialist schools close

New dedicated hubs for Deaf children are needed around the country to provide new social spaces, education and support, an expert has said.

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Research to explore farmers’ experiences of isolation, loneliness and mental health issues

New research led by the University of Exeter and The Farming Community Network (FCN) aims to explore how social isolation, loneliness and mental health issues within the farming community are experienced and managed – and how to improve support available.

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Third of people feel “angry” at prospect of the UK leaving the EU without a deal

A third of people feel “very angry” at the prospect of Britain leaving the EU without a deal, according to a major new survey which suggests people are resigned to the failure of Brexit talks.

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A change at the top before elections boosts MP turnover across Europe, research shows

Appointing a new leader just before an election leads to a higher turnover of MPs after the poll, a study of political parties across Europe during the past 80 years shows.

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People prefer coronavirus contact tracing to be carried out by a combination of apps and humans, study shows

People prefer coronavirus contact tracing to be carried out by a combination of apps and humans, a new study shows.

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3D printing poses a “grave and growing threat” to people’s privacy, experts warn

3D printing technology poses a “grave and growing threat” to individual privacy because of the potential for products to reveal private information about individuals, experts have warned.

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Weapons not used by officers in majority of police incidents involving force, data suggests

Weapons were not used in the majority of police incidents where officers had to use force, the first detailed analysis of statistics from a new national reporting system suggests.

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Noam Chomsky in conversation on free speech with Exeter Professor

Linguist and philosopher, Noam Chomsky, will speak to Professor Robert Lamb from the University of Exeter, in a free online event.

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Personal connections key to helping communities cope with devastating impact of climate change

Connections with friends and family are key to helping communities adapt to the devastating impact of climate change on their homes and livelihoods, a new study shows.

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The brains of nonpartisans are different from those who register to vote with a party, major new study shows

The brains of people with no political allegiance are different from those who strongly support one party, major new research shows.

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Professor Michael Dumper Publishes New Book

The book, titled "Power, Piety and People: the Politics of Holy Cities in the 21st Century" is out with Columbia University Press.

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Home-educated children left without qualifications as exams replaced with teacher-predicted grades, study shows

The cancellation of exams this year in favour of teacher-predicted grades has had a “significantly detrimental” impact on many home-educated children, who are not able to gain qualifications this summer, a study warns.

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State of the art computational analysis used to track online extremist far-right European groups

State of the art computational analysis is being used to track the growth and influence of online extremist far-right groups in Europe as part of a major new study.

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New study to discover inequalities caused by coronavirus pandemic and Brexit across Britain

Mass surveys and in-depth fieldwork across England will be used to explore how the coronavirus pandemic is both creating new social inequalities as well as reinforcing existing ones.

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Development of international principles for sustainable securities lending gains global traction

Experts and major organisations have co-created the first international principles that will encourage more concerted efforts towards sustainable securities lending.

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UK Social Mobility Awards

The University of Exeter has been shortlisted for both Innovation and University of the Year in the UK Social Mobility Awards. 

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New soap opera, comic and apps being used to tackle kidnappings in Mexico

A new soap opera, comic and app are the latest weapons being used to tackle the epidemic of kidnappings in Mexico.

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Extinction Rebellion’s activists more likely to be new to protesting, study shows

Extinction Rebellion supporters are more likely to be new to protesting than other environmental activists, a new study shows.

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Agricultural jobs website launches to connect farms with work-seekers

With an acute labour shortage in the seasonal farming industry and millions of people either out of work or furloughed, The Land Army was born with the goal of connecting farms and agricultural businesses with suitable candidates quickly. 

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Research into what helps couples to thrive used to teach teenagers about healthy relationships

Research showing the key features of healthy relationships will be used in schools around the country to help teenagers learn how to build healthy relationships of their own.

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Theft law needs reform to reduce the risk of judgements which lack “common sense”, new study warns

Theft law needs reform so the crime is based on consent not dishonesty – reducing the risk of judgements which lack “common sense” – a new study warns.

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Talking about grammar is a crucial tool in literacy teaching, study shows

Discussion between teachers and children about writing is a crucial tool to help pupils learn about grammar, a new study shows.

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Science education community should withdraw from international tests which have led to “narrow” curricula and pedagogy, study says

The science community should withdraw from involvement in international tests such as PISA because they have forced schools to adopt “narrow” curricula and pedagogies, a study says.

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Law and Business module redesign is national example of best practice

The University of Exeter team for the National Learning Design BootCamp 2020 presented their redesign of a core undergraduate module to the final national conference last week.

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Decision to replace exams with predicted grades during coronavirus has left pupils feeling “powerless” survey shows

The decision to replace GCSE and A-level exams with predicted grades this summer has left pupils feeling “powerless” and “overwhelmingly” concerned with their grades, a major survey shows.

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Public in France and Germany support a European military, security and defence policy, survey shows

People in France and Germany support building greater European military capacity and security and defence policy, a survey shows.

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New study will investigate risks COVID-19 "immunity passports" pose to human rights

A new study will examine the risks coronavirus “immunity passports” pose to human rights as more countries begin to use technology to monitor health during the pandemic.

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Guild Teaching Awards 2020

We’re delighted to announce the winners and college shortlist for the Teaching Awards 2020.

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Giving people “digital literacy” tips can help them spot dubious information online, study shows

Giving people “digital literacy” tips can help them identify dubious information online, a new study shows.

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Former Foreign Secretary heads panel discussion

David Miliband, president of the International Rescue Committee, is headlining an online panel discussion that is examining the impacts of COVID-19 on developing countries.

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University of Exeter research leads to historic introduction of no fault divorce in England

Influential University of Exeter research has led to the historic introduction of no fault divorce in England and Wales.

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Concerns for disadvantaged teenagers as activities to encourage them to apply to university disrupted during coronavirus lockdown, research shows

University staff working with prospective students are concerned about the prospects of those from disadvantaged homes as their work is disrupted or put on hold during the coronavirus lockdown, research shows.

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Appetite for fast fashion goes out of style when people learn about impact of mass-produced clothing, study shows

Learning in groups how to make, mend and modify clothing reduces the appetite for fast fashion, a new study shows.

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Innovative programme where children use their own voice to improve reading open for more participants

An innovative education programme which helps children improve their reading by using the sound of their own voice is open for more participants.

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Disadvantaged pupils could be unfairly penalised by coronavirus predicted grades, expert warns

This year’s system of using predicted grades to award A-level and GCSE results should be closely monitored to ensure it doesn’t unfairly penalise disadvantaged pupils, a social mobility expert has warned.

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Insurers should be willing to negotiate coronavirus claims to avoid courts being overwhelmed, study warns

Insurers should be open to negotiating coronavirus claims to avoid courts becoming overwhelmed with disputes, a new study warns.

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Public relying on BBC news as source of information about coronavirus, analysis shows

News from the BBC about coronavirus has been shared significantly more on social media than articles from journalists in other organisations, new research suggests.

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Efforts to speed up police digital forensic analysis must be more efficient, study shows

Efforts by police forces to speed up digital forensic analysis could lead to oversights in evidence gathering and interpretation, a new study warns.

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Covid generation faces ‘dark age’ of low social mobility - young Britons at risk of long-term damage to future life prospects

The unprecedented economic and educational shocks of the Covid-19 pandemic could inflict long-term damage to young people’s prospects in life, a new study finds.

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Student raises £10,000 for mental health charity by running five marathons in five days

A University of Exeter student has raised £10,000 for those affected by mental health issues during the coronavirus pandemic by running 131 miles in just five days.

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Training bystanders to intervene will help to prevent domestic violence and abuse, study shows

Empowering people to intervene when they witness unacceptable behaviour can help to prevent domestic violence and abuse, a new study has found.

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Early African Muslims had a halal – and cosmopolitan diet - discovery of thousands of ancient animal bones shows

Early Muslim communities in Africa ate a cosmopolitan diet as the region became a trading centre for luxury goods, the discovery of thousands of ancient animal bones has shown.

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New study will show impact of coronavirus on Britain’s crucial food supply chains

The impact of coronavirus on Britain’s crucial food supply chains will be tracked as part of a new study which will show how the current crisis has affected the journey from farm to plate.

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Video link weddings should be allowed to help the desperately ill during the coronavirus pandemic, expert recommends

Weddings via video link should be allowed for those desperately ill during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a leading marriage-law expert.

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Games to bring laughter and help families during coronavirus lockdown

A University of Exeter expert has come up with games featuring dancing, storytelling, running and acting to help families struggling to think of new things to do at home during the coronavirus lockdown.

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Voters across Europe perceive the EU as less democratic than it is, survey suggests

Large portions of voters across Europe misunderstand the workings of the European Union and think it is less democratic than it actually is, research suggests.

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Public would obey major changes to antibiotic advice, research shows

The public would comply with major changes to medical advice – but would then be less likely to follow other new guidelines in the future, research shows.

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Coronavirus has led to major change in attitudes about parental responsibility for children’s education, survey shows

School closures have led to a change in attitudes among parents about who should be responsible for their child’s education, a major new survey shows.

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Covid lockdown could leave disadvantaged children with “learning loss” of six months, experts warn

School closures during the coronavirus lockdown could leave disadvantaged children with “learning loss” of up to six months, leading social mobility experts have warned.

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University of Exeter expert elected to prestigious American Academy of Arts & Sciences

A University of Exeter expert has been elected to one of the world’s most prestigious academic organisations.

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Exeter researchers secure prestigious national fellowships

Five leading researchers from across disciplines at the University of Exeter have received prestigious national fellowships, it has been announced.

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CAIS launches blog on the global politics of COVID-19

Drs John Heathershaw and Brieg Powel lead the pandemipolitics.net initiative - a new blog where CAIS experts unpack the political dimension of the ongoing pandemic.

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Experts to develop new ways of monitoring and tackling extreme right-wing online forums

University of Exeter experts will develop new ways to better monitor activity on extreme right-wing online forums linked with terrorism as part of a major new research project.

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Exeter team receives a CREST award for research on far-right forums

Drs Stephane Baele, Lewys Brace and Travis Coan, based at Q-STEP and CAIS, conduct research on the far-right "Chan" forums.

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Couples should work as a team and make plans for the future to ensure their relationship thrives during coronavirus lockdown, experts say

Couples trying to cope with the coronavirus lockdown should work as a team and make future plans to keep their relationship strong during the crisis, experts have said.

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Parents can have their say on impact of school closures on families as part of major new research project

Parents can have their say on how their families are coping with the upheaval of school closures as part of a major new research project set up to track the impact of coronavirus.

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Interactive product labels require new regulations, study warns

Artificial intelligence will be increasingly used on labels on food and other products in the future to make them interactive, and regulations should be reformed now so they take account of new innovations, a study warns.

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“Blind over-reliance” on AI technology to manage international migration could lead to serious breaches of human rights, study warns

Over-reliance by countries on artificial intelligence to tackle international migration and manage future migration crisis could lead to serious breaches of human rights, a new study warns.

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University of Exeter new partner in £2.8million ESRC investment in social science methods training

University of Exeter experts will help to train academics from throughout the UK in cutting-edge research methods as part of a major new national initiative.

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Facebook “prominent gateway” to untrustworthy websites during 2016 US presidential election, study shows

Facebook was the most prominent gateway to untrustworthy websites during the 2016 US Presidential election, a new study shows.

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Exeter subjects ranked amongst the world’s best, according to influential league table

Subjects across the Arts and Sciences at the University of Exeter have been recognised as being amongst the very best worldwide, in the latest influential global league table.

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Male doctoral graduates more likely to have a full-time, permanent job than their female counterparts, study shows

Male doctoral graduates are more likely to get a permanent job compared to their female counterparts, a new study shows.

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Innovative Student Equality, Diversity and Inclusivity Excellence awards launched

These awards will be made to students who have passionately and expertly advanced the EDI agenda for the College.

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