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Centre for Political Thought

The Centre for Political Thought at Exeter encompasses one of the largest cluster of theorists and historians of political thought in the UK. Its distinctive characters are the diversity of areas and approaches, as well as the intellectual dialogue that fosters across them. Such a dialogue, combined with interdisciplinarity, is central to our weekly ‘reading group’, where colleagues and students from Exeter and other Universities present their research or discuss classical and recent texts.

The Centre promotes collaborative research and is part of an increasing number of international networks. It organizes seminars, workshops, and book symposia, many of which are published in top theory journals. Its ambition is to be a place for the exchange and scrutiny of ideas, as well as global collaboration in research.

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Images ©: National Trust Images/Andrew Butler; Paul Klee, Angelus Novus; CC/Kevin O’Neil; Unsplash/Mayur Deshpande; CC/A. Walker.

In focus

A book by Ross Carroll on Uncivil Mirth

Ross Carroll discusses his new book.  Video of launch now available.  

A book by Robert Lamb on Property

Robert Lamb discusses his new book.  

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Postgraduate studies

Exeter has a strong tradition in Political Theory. Our MA in Political Thought offers the opportunity to study political thought in depth by examining texts, thinkers and traditions; exploring debates in social and political theory; offering the critical tools for analysis and interpretation. Students are fully integrated in the research culture of the Centre through their participation in the weekly Political Theory Reading Group.

Postgraduate research

The Centre is home to an intellectually vibrant and supportive network of PhD students, who are both teaching colleagues and fellow researchers. Students pursue a range of research interests; have excellent facilities for discussion of topics, texts and thinkers; and have ample opportunity to engage in interdisciplinary work, as well as developing professionally by participating in conferences, workshops, and the weekly Reading Group meetings.

Andy's Interviews

As part of his course on Power and Democracy, Andrew Schaap has interviewed a number of scholars who have written on main topics that he touches in his lectures and classes, such as: Public monuments (Mihai), Unelected representatives (Saward), Democratic spectatorship (Green), Deliberation day (Fishkin), The limits of epistocracy (Bhatia), The ‘white working class’ (Bhambra), and The politics of listening (Bassel).
Here are the interviews (at the moment only those with an Exeter affiliation can listen to them, we hope to make them more widely available soon).