Research seminars

On this page we list any forthcoming seminars in the department of Politics. See also the seminars for all of SSIS.

Any SSIS staff or postgrads may always attend. Anyone else should contact the department or the centre in question.

WhenDescriptionLocationAdd to your calendar
27 February 2018

Q-Step : Network Analysis

The workshop provides an introduction for beginners to Social Network Analysis. It gives an overview of key concepts needed to design research that looks at social relations (networks) that connect individual units (actors), so that students can apply social network analysis to their own research. The workshop focuses on the description and visualisation of social network data, looking at structural properties of a network, as well as ideas of centrality in the network. To understand the SNA perspective, practical examples are given from academic literature, illustrative graphics from the media, and source material visualised through R. Experience in R is expected although not required. We will use a combination of slides and R code exercise. Full details
Old Library Research Seminar Room A/B20 Add this to your calendar
6 March 2018

Q-Step : Agent-based modeling

Though models sit at the centre of lines of social inquiry as diverse as game theory, statistical analysis, qualitative analysis, and political philosophy, all involve an attempt to describe core elements of the world in a way that helps us to understand, value, and predict that world. With Agent Based Models, computer simulations of the behaviours of many agents work deductively from simplified assumptions to create dynamic interactions that can be examined over a range of conditions to make inductive arguments about the nature of the world. In this generative reasoning approach, agents with very simple micromotives can lead to complex adaptive systems in which qualitatively different macrobehaviours emerge. How do very simple assumptions about drivers, city dwellers, and voters lead to complex emergent phenomena like traffic jams, housing segregation, and party realignment? In this lecture, I’ll introduce answers to these questions by building models of these problems and highlight tools you can use to develop your own agent based models. Full details
Old Library Research Seminar Room A/B20 Add this to your calendar
7 March 2018

Special workshop on Spaces of Conflict, Security and Development

Full details
Amory A239CAdd this to your calendar
7 March 2018

Public Policy Seminar Series: Matt Lobley, Professor in Rural Resource Management

“Farmers are hefted onto land and we don't transplant very easily”: The challenge of retirement in the agricultural sector. Full details
Amory B143Add this to your calendar
7 March 2018

Cake for Comments Series: Stephen Greasley, Lecturer in Politics, Exeter

‘Corporate reputation in the outsourced state’ (draft article). Full details
Amory B218 Add this to your calendar
8 March 2018

Q-Step: Text Analysis - Python

tbc. Full details
Building:One Syndicate Room B Add this to your calendar
9 March 2018

Politics PGR Research Seminar Series: Presentation by Milka Ivanovska Hadjievska

‘Professionalised but yet participatory? Membership involvement across parties, advocacy groups and service providing organisations in the UK and Norway’ (co-authored with Torill Stavenes). Full details
Building:One Marchant Syndicate Room AAdd this to your calendar
13 March 2018

Q-Step : Multilevel modeling

In this tutorial, we introduce multilevel models as extensions of regression-type models suited to analyse hierarchical or nested data, such as children's SATs test scores nested within classes or schools, individual survey responses nested within interviewers, or, potentially, any measure taken repeatedly over time. Full details
Old Library Research Seminar Room A/B20Add this to your calendar
14 March 2018

Public Policy Seminar Series: Alice Moseley, Lecturer in Politics

New Frontiers in Public Administration: The Behavioural Perspective. Full details
Amory B143Add this to your calendar
21 March 2018

Public Policy Seminar Series: Oliver James, Professor of Politics

The Data Revolution in Government Performance Reporting: Evidence from Experiments with Citizens and Users. Full details
Amory B143Add this to your calendar
21 March 2018

CAIS Brownbag Seminar: Saipira FURSTENBERG & John HEATHERSHAW – Forms of State Repression and Practice in an Age of Globalisation: The Case of Central Asian Political Exiles.

Full details
XFI Seminar Room BAdd this to your calendar
21 March 2018

Cake for Comments Series: Benjamin Lyons, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Exeter

Title tbc (draft article). Full details
Amory B310Add this to your calendar
21 March 2018

Politics Departmental Research Seminar (Term 2) - Professor Milja Kurki, Aberystwyth University: 'Sovereignty’s Unseen Battle Battalions: Democracy Support as a Practice of Sovereignty'

From Trump supporters to Brexiteers, last few years have seen a rise of ‘sovereigntism’, a renewed defence of the principle of sovereign statehood as a principle of governance. This has been surprising for many analysts and practitioners of politics as they had increasingly come to the view that the principle of sovereignty had either waned in its classical (Westphalian) meaning or had transformed into something new, at best a qualified, fragmented, externally-conditioned kind of sovereign principle. Yet, precisely this expectation reveals the lack of attention paid by analysts and political practitioners to a series of deep, and long-running, battle-battalions of the classical principle of sovereignty in global politics. These battle-battalions have remained ‘hidden’ and their defence of sovereignty has been by and large ‘implicit’; yet, they have been powerful and sustained in their efforts to stamp down on political struggles for forms of governance not premised on sovereignty. Focused on one such battle-battalion – the policy practice of democracy support and the attached agendas of development – this article seeks to both a. convey the intensity of hidden battles over sovereignty over the last three decades and b. the role seemingly innocuous, liberal, seemingly non-sovereigntist policy tools in elimination of actors and activities advocating non-or 'extra'-sovereign political imaginations. I argue that to understand the centrality of the defence of sovereignty for these efforts helps us understand the surprising resilience of sovereign political form. Furthermore, highlighting the role of the long-running battle-battalions for sovereignty ‘hidden in plain sight’ also helps us to grapple with the limits of global political imagination and democratic politics in 21st century international politics.. Full details
Building:One Bateman Lecture TheatreAdd this to your calendar
23 March 2018

Politics PGR Research Seminar Series: Presentations by Francesca Farmer and Torill Stavenes

Francesca Farmer, ‘Cybercrime vs hacktivism: do we need a differentiated regulatory approach?’ Torill Stavenes, 'Money and members: An analysis of the influence of state funding on centralisation in new minor parties in Italy'. Full details
Building:One Marchant Syndicate Room AAdd this to your calendar
13 April 2018

Politics PGR Research Seminar Series: Presentations by Adrian Colston and Burcin Demirbilek

Adrian Colston, ‘Stakeholder attitudes to the narratives of the Dartmoor Commons: tradition and the search for consensus in a time of change’ Burcin Demirbilek (Penryn), (TBC). Full details
Amory A239CAdd this to your calendar
20 April 2018

Politics PGR Research Seminar Series: Presentation by Lily Habash Shayebhilal

Title TBC. Full details
Amory B218 Add this to your calendar
11 May 2018

Politics PGR Research Seminar Series: Presentation by Rebecca Baker

Measuring democratic quality? Youth participation in Plymouth.. Full details
Amory A239CAdd this to your calendar
22 May 2018

Challenging Dominant Discourse

This workshop seeks to map connections between feminist methods in political science and political theory in order to share resources for questioning dominant methods across the discipline of politics. We welcome papers that investigate feminist methods in a variety of approaches to politics, including democratic theory, international relations, quantitative measurement, environmental politics, public policy, and normative political philosophy. Submissions may be works-in-progress, finished papers, or even past work. Participants are encouraged to read their own work through the lens of the question “how is this work feminist?” We hope the workshop will address questions such as: What are feminist methods? How do dominant methods marginalize women’s experience? How have technological advancements in quantitative methods reproduced gendered relations of power? How might feminist methods or practices open up interdisciplinary pathways between political science and political theory? How can methods in political science and political theory be intersectional? How does work on gender differ from feminist work? Must feminist projects deploy feminist methods?. Full details
Building:One Bateman Lecture TheatreAdd this to your calendar

Past seminars

We also have a listing of past research seminars, where in some cases you can download recordings from the event.