Postgraduate Module Descriptor


POLM144: The West, Civilizations and World Order

This module descriptor refers to the 2018/9 academic year.

Module Aims

This module will introduce you to the study of transatlantic relations and ‘the West’ in international relations. It aims to provide you with a firm grasp and a critical perspective on the key historical developments, theoretical approaches, policy debates, and political controversies on the transatlantic community and ‘the West’, and their relationship to world order. The module will familiarise you with the histories and theories of the transatlantic relation, the processes and politics of Western identity construction, controversies surrounding the notion of the West as a civilization, debates about the Western or universal character of global governance institutions, democracy and human rights, critiques of Western-centrism in the social sciences and world politics, and the future of the transatlantic community and ‘the West’ in an era of power diffusion and multi-polarity.

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)

This module's assessment will evaluate your achievement of the ILOs listed here - you will see reference to these ILO numbers in the details of the assessment for this module.

On successfully completing the programme you will be able to:
Module-Specific Skills1. discuss the histories, theories, and case studies about the transatlantic relation and ‘the West’ in international relations;
2. evaluate the internal dynamics and external influences of the transatlantic relation and ‘the West’ in world politics;
Discipline-Specific Skills3. demonstrate an understanding of the debates and theories about the transatlantic relation and ‘the West’ as a field of academic knowledge and its applicability to a range of case studies and empirical situations;
4. exercise informed judgment concerning the internal dynamics and external influence of the transatlantic community on world order;
5. exercise informed judgment concerning the role of the concept of ‘the West’ in scholarly, policy and public debates in world politics;
Personal and Key Skills6. exercise informed judgment concerning the role of the concept of ‘the West’ in scholarly, policy and public debates in world politics;
7. write and present complex arguments clearly and persuasively; and
8. demonstrate critical judgment and confidence in articulating and defending your opinions.