Events

Further events of interest can be found in the College of Social Sciences and International Studies events calendar.

Past Egenis events can be found here.

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20 May 201915:30

EGENIS seminar series: "Assembling the Dinosaur" Lukas Rieppel (Brown University, USA)

Although dinosaur fossils were first found in England, a series of dramatic discoveries during the late 19th century turned North America into a world center for vertebrate paleontology. At the same time, the United States emerged as the world’s largest industrial economy, and creatures like tyrannosaurus, brontosaurus, and triceratops became emblems of American capitalism. Large, fierce, and spectacular, American dinosaurs soon dominated the popular imagination, making front-page headlines and appearing in feature films. Full details
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10 June 201915:30

EGENIS seminar series: "An empirical challenge for scientific pluralism – Alternatives or Integration?" Sophie Juliane Veigl (University of Vienna, Austria)

Scientific pluralism has become an increasingly popular position in the philosophy of science. One shared notion among scientific pluralists is that some or all natural phenomena require more than one theory, explanation or method to be fully understood. One distinction within pluralist positions is often overlooked. Some pluralists argue that several theories or explanations should be integrated (e.g. Mitchell, 2002). Others rather treat different theories and explanations as alternatives (e.g. Kellert, Longino and Waters, 2006). But does this distinction address the “nature” of the respective phenomena? And, consecutively: Are there genuine cases of “alternative” or “integrative” pluralism? In this talk I challenge this perspective and argue that it is not possible to uphold the distinction of alternatives vs. integration. Full details
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17 June 201915:30

EGENIS seminar series: Ariane Hanemaayer (Brandon University, Canada)

Title & abstract to follow. Full details
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24 June 201915:30

Prof Dr Hakan Ertin

Egenis seminar series. Title & abstract to follow. Full details
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20 - 21 June 2019

"Science and Values" Integrated History and Philosophy of Science Workshop

Questions of value have always played a role in the history and philosophy of science. Philosophical questions surrounding scientific realism, for instance, often turn on the epistemic value or otherwise of virtues such as ‘simplicity’. While historians have long recognised this, philosophers have recently begun to acknowledge a wide range of values - the political, moral and aesethetic - in understanding scientific practices. This opens up a variety of new questions, both historical and philosophical, regarding the relationship between scientific practice and its historical development on the one hand, and the role of values—understood broadly. Consideration of the role of values in research provokes a host of historical and philosophical questions, typically well suited to an integrated HPS approach. This meeting of the iHPS will focus on such questions. Full details
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15 - 16 July 20198:30

"Animal Research Unbound" Conference

Much social scientific, philosophical and historical work on animal research has followed the enclosures around research communities and the relatively closed nature of animal research to highlight the construction of boundaries around animal research. This includes the ethical boundary work used to justify the use of animals in research, the human-animal and species boundaries constructed through research practices, the regulatory boundaries shaping responsibilities for animal use and care, through the spatial and material infrastructures that separate the animal house and laboratory. Even work tracing the accelerating mobilities and movements of research using animals often starts from consideration of how these might overcome boundaries between previously closed species and spaces of animal research. Full details
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WhenTimeDescriptionAdd to your calendar
20 May 201915:30

EGENIS seminar series: "Assembling the Dinosaur" Lukas Rieppel (Brown University, USA)

Although dinosaur fossils were first found in England, a series of dramatic discoveries during the late 19th century turned North America into a world center for vertebrate paleontology. At the same time, the United States emerged as the world’s largest industrial economy, and creatures like tyrannosaurus, brontosaurus, and triceratops became emblems of American capitalism. Large, fierce, and spectacular, American dinosaurs soon dominated the popular imagination, making front-page headlines and appearing in feature films. Full details
Add event
10 June 201915:30

EGENIS seminar series: "An empirical challenge for scientific pluralism – Alternatives or Integration?" Sophie Juliane Veigl (University of Vienna, Austria)

Scientific pluralism has become an increasingly popular position in the philosophy of science. One shared notion among scientific pluralists is that some or all natural phenomena require more than one theory, explanation or method to be fully understood. One distinction within pluralist positions is often overlooked. Some pluralists argue that several theories or explanations should be integrated (e.g. Mitchell, 2002). Others rather treat different theories and explanations as alternatives (e.g. Kellert, Longino and Waters, 2006). But does this distinction address the “nature” of the respective phenomena? And, consecutively: Are there genuine cases of “alternative” or “integrative” pluralism? In this talk I challenge this perspective and argue that it is not possible to uphold the distinction of alternatives vs. integration. Full details
Add event
17 June 201915:30

EGENIS seminar series: Ariane Hanemaayer (Brandon University, Canada)

Title & abstract to follow. Full details
Add event
20 - 21 June 2019

"Science and Values" Integrated History and Philosophy of Science Workshop

Questions of value have always played a role in the history and philosophy of science. Philosophical questions surrounding scientific realism, for instance, often turn on the epistemic value or otherwise of virtues such as ‘simplicity’. While historians have long recognised this, philosophers have recently begun to acknowledge a wide range of values - the political, moral and aesethetic - in understanding scientific practices. This opens up a variety of new questions, both historical and philosophical, regarding the relationship between scientific practice and its historical development on the one hand, and the role of values—understood broadly. Consideration of the role of values in research provokes a host of historical and philosophical questions, typically well suited to an integrated HPS approach. This meeting of the iHPS will focus on such questions. Full details
Add event
24 June 201915:30

Prof Dr Hakan Ertin

Egenis seminar series. Title & abstract to follow. Full details
Add event
15 - 16 July 20198:30

"Animal Research Unbound" Conference

Much social scientific, philosophical and historical work on animal research has followed the enclosures around research communities and the relatively closed nature of animal research to highlight the construction of boundaries around animal research. This includes the ethical boundary work used to justify the use of animals in research, the human-animal and species boundaries constructed through research practices, the regulatory boundaries shaping responsibilities for animal use and care, through the spatial and material infrastructures that separate the animal house and laboratory. Even work tracing the accelerating mobilities and movements of research using animals often starts from consideration of how these might overcome boundaries between previously closed species and spaces of animal research. Full details
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