Research events

Research events play an important role in our active research culture. Academic staff from the University and other institutions come together with students to share and debate the latest ideas and developments.

WhenTimeDescriptionLocationAdd to Calendar
26 - 28 June 20179:00

Kurdish Futures In and Outside of Iraq, Syria, Turkey, and Iran: Fresh Hopes or New Tragedies?

Following the success of the last two previous Kurdish studies conferences here in 2012 and 2015 at the University of Exeter Centre for Kurdish Studies, our next conference event will be held over 2.5 days: 26th – 28th June 2017. The theme for this event will be: Kurdish Futures In and Outside of Iraq, Syria, Turkey, and Iran: Fresh Hopes or New Tragedies? Venue: Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies, University of Exeter, Stocker Rd, Exeter, EX4 4ND Further details: http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/iais/research/centres/kurdish/newsandevents/conferences/ or contact z.humble@exeter.ac.uk - Ms Zoe Humble Full details
IAIS Building/LT1Add this to your calendar
10 - 11 July 20179:00

2017 Exeter Gulf Conference - "Hegemonic Boundaries and Asymmetric Power in the Gulf"

In recent decades, scholarship on the Middle East has benefited from a dynamic approach to the relationship between identities and boundaries. The post-structural turn encouraged us to think beyond bounded communities to reveal the interconnections, exchanges and forms of relationality that cross and contest perceived cultural and national boundaries. More recently, the Arab revolutions brought our attention to discourses of liberation throughout the region along with collective challenges to hegemonic power and hopes for new moral communities. Full details
IAIS Building/LT1Add this to your calendar
18 July 201711:30

LEEP Seminar: Eliciting values for complex goods: community preferences for the marine environment

Managers and the general public may have different preferences for marine management. This implies that expert-driven planning approaches may not attract the necessary public support to achieve biodiversity objectives. To understand public preferences for management, we elicited spatially explicit non-market values for marine ecological features in South-East Queensland in Australia. Our survey revealed that the Queensland population has higher existence values for different habitat types; for example, sea grass areas were valued twice as much as inshore reef areas. Full details
Queens Building MR2Add this to your calendar