Events

Listed below are forthcoming events in Sociology, Philosophy and Anthropology.

See also all events in the College of Social Sciences and International Studies.

Any college staff or postgraduates may always attend. Anyone else should contact the department or the centre in question.

WhenDescriptionLocationAdd to your calendar
20 November 2017

Q-Step: Intro to Python

Python is increasingly used by social scientists to collect, process and analyse new types of unstructured or semi-structured data, such as online text and social media data. It is a an accessible, yet versatile programming language which is also broadly used for data science and machine learning tasks, combining multiple types of data, simulation and visualization. This workshop provides an introduction to basic programming notions in Python, and introduces some of the most useful packages used in social science research. No previous programming experience is required. NOTE: This workshop is a prerequisite for the following Q-Step workshops (to be offered this and next term): Collecting Social Media Data, Data Analysis in Python, Text Analysis.. Full details
Forum Exploration Lab 1Add this to your calendar
20 November 2017

"From A Glance to Insider View: Researching English Football Fans" Dr Jessica Richards (University of Sydney, Australia)

Egenis seminar series. Gaining access to the research field has received much academic attention, however little work has focused on the difficulties researchers face once in the field. This presentation proposes that by outlining the multiple stages of the fieldwork journey, a more reflexive approach to fieldwork and the research process can be attained. Drawing on a three-year ethnographic study of the match-day experiences of the fans of Everton Football Club, this presentation recounts how my position in my research community changed as the research developed. This presentation advocates that researchers should be more critical of their position in the field of their research, and should seek to identify this more clearly in their scholarship. This in turn would enable for more discussions of how each stage of the fieldwork journey affected the scope and overall findings of the research. Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
30 November 2017

Q-Step : Designing Experiments

At the workshop we will consider basic principles of designing field and survey experiments. We will start with discussing the idea of causal inference and randomisation. Then we will review several experimental designs: completely randomised, stratified, paired, cluster randomised, factorial. Next, we will discuss statistical power in experiments and conclude with a review of the methods for the analysis of experimental data, such as ANOVA and linear model. The workshop will be useful for Q-Step undergraduate students planning to use experiments for their dissertations, as well as for postgraduate students. Full details
Peter Chalk Centre 2.4Add this to your calendar
4 December 2017

Matt Dawson (University of Glasgow) “Morality as Rebellion: Towards a Partial Reconciliation of

SPA Seminar series. Full details
Amory B105Add this to your calendar
6 December 2017

Prof Giovanni Boniolo (University of Ferrara, Italy)

Egenis seminar series. Please note that this is a Wednesday and not the customary Monday. Title & abstract to follow. Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
7 December 2017

Q-Step: Collecting Social Media Data

This workshop provides an introduction to the main methods used to access, download and store social media data. You will learn how to use Twitter's APIs to collect tweets and user details, and how to collect Facebook posts and comments. Basic knowledge of programming in Python is required, and participants are required to attend the "Intro to Python" workshop first.. Full details
Peter Chalk Centre 1.3Add this to your calendar
11 December 2017

“What is an Ethical Autism Research Culture?” Chloe Silverman (Drexel University, USA)

Egenis seminar series. There is currently little formal guidance for autism researchers seeking to design studies in an ethically conscientious fashion, despite a history of research designs that have incorporated potentially harmful assumptions about the causes and consequences of autism. Published work on autism research ethics has focused primarily on research conduct and responsible communication of findings, with less focus on research design ethics. This persists despite lively conversations and substantive recommendations on this topic from self-advocates, as well as suggestive findings on how research design can be affected by a range of community engagement practices. This talk describes a project still in its early stages that aims to use stakeholder consultation to generate a set of guidelines for ethical autism research design. By comparing the perspectives and publications of researchers who do and do not use forms of community engagement, the project will evaluate whether and how such practices affect research design ethics. One goal of this project is to generate evidence of how community engagement (as one type of ethical research design practice) might benefit both stakeholders and researchers, yielding findings that may be both more innovative and more robust. Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
8 January 2018

Francois Ribac (Université de Bourgogne) “Performing Arts and Music in the Anthropocene Era: issues and perspectives”

SPA Seminar series. Full details
Laver Building LT3Add this to your calendar
10 January 2018

"Objectivity and the reconstruction of life’s past" Edna Suárez-Díaz (The National Autonomous University of Mexico)

Egenis seminar series. Since the 1960s, the field of molecular systematics has been transformed by the mathematization and automation of criteria and decision-making. Its goal is the objective reconstruction of phylogenetic relations among biological species, also formulated as the elimination of subjectivity (E. Suárez-Díaz y Anaya-Muñoz 2008; Suárez y Anaya 2009). The molecularization of evolutionary biology, and the introduction of huge data-bases containing sequences of DNA and proteins, along with an increased use of computers and mathematical algorithms made this process possible. In this seminar, I will briefly describe the historical context for this “methodological anxiety”, and describe some of the statistical tools devised to solve the several problems arising in the reconstruction of life’s past. In a recent paper written with Victor Anaya we also argue that attention to the philosophical disputes between the taxonomic schools of cladism, evolutionary systematics, and phenetics has acted as an obstacle for a narrative focused on practices, and a historical and epistemological reflection on objectivity as practiced in a localized scientific field. Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
29 January 2018

Dr Emilly Troscianko (University of Oxford)

Egenis seminar series. Title and abstract to follow. Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
5 February 2018

Liz Irvine (Cardiff University) “Interaction, Minds and Meaning in Pragmatics”

SPA Seminar series. Full details
Amory C417Add this to your calendar
19 February 2018

Petter Hellström (Uppsala University, Sweden)

Egenis seminar series. Title and abstract to follow. Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
26 February 2018

Dr Sarah Chaney (Queen Mary University of London)

Egenis seminar series. Title and abstract to follow. Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
5 March 2018

Lorna Finlayson (University of Essex) “Madness, present and pervasive: Laingian social pathology and the spectre of organicism”

SPA Seminar series. Full details
Amory C417Add this to your calendar
19 March 2018

Elise Tancoigne (University of Geneva)

Egenis seminar series. Title and abstract to follow. Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar