Events

Listed below are forthcoming events in Sociology, Philosophy and Anthropology.

See also all events in the College of Social Sciences and International Studies.

Any college staff or postgraduates may always attend. Anyone else should contact the department or the centre in question.

WhenTimeDescriptionLocationAdd to Calendar
28 - 29 November 2014

"Concerning Relations: Sociologies of Conduct, Care and Affect" - Prof Michael Schillmeier

This interdisciplinary symposium, funded by Foundation for the Sociology of Health and Illness (FSHI) and Exeter University, aims to interrogate the implications of shifting the focus of health care away from delivery towards care as an ongoing everyday accomplishment. This symposium examines spaces of collisions, elisions or alignments of social worlds, within which the affective dimension of social life in healthcare may be fruitfully examined. Drawing upon relational concerns as a distinct and distinctive mode of sociological inquiry, the symposium seeks to develop an understanding of care and its consequences that help us get beyond the economics of care as a commodified and managed form of engagement with the other. Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
3 December 201415:00

Prof. Malcolm Cowburn"Ethical issues in (qualitative) research with sex offenders"

Abstract: This paper reflects on some ethical and epistemological issues involved in conducting qualitative research with sex offenders that is respectful to all parties involved in the offence. It considers three issues: • Hegemonic knowledge and the shaping of research agendas. Most research about sex offenders is conducted on/with convicted populations. Most sex offenders only receive one conviction for sexual offences. The number of sexual offences continues to increase. The ethical difficulties in researching ‘unconvicted’ offenders restrict research in an area that may be most helpful in reducing sex crimes. • Dilemmas related to the development of new knowledge whilst not contributing harming others. Central to this problem is the issue of confidentiality; traditionally criminological research has operated within a context of offering total confidentiality to research participants. In researching sexual and violent offences this is potentially problematic where participants may disclose unreported offences or the intention to harm others in the future. • Constraints and possibilities of the qualitative interview – recognising and managing interpersonal/dialogical issues. Two issues are considered here, and they both relate to the issue of ‘objectivity’ in interview practice. The first area briefly considers the problem of ‘value’ dissonance where interviewers are required to listen to material that strongly conflicts with their own values. The second area is the managing of distress in a qualitative interview. Whilst principle based ethics can provide guidelines for conducting research they potentially restrict respectful dialogue between researcher and research participant. Character relationship based approaches (e.g. ‘virtue ethics’, ‘ethics of care’ and ‘post-modern ethics’) may offer greater scope for developing respectful research practice. Full details
Amory B316Add this to your calendar
8 December 201415:30

"Studio Interventions in Fieldwork Along the Way: Contemporary Collaborative Environments of Ethnographic Research. “ - George Marcus (University of California)

Egenis Seminar. Late addition. Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
10 December 201415:00

Prof. George Marcus, UC Irvine. title tbc

SPA Research Seminar Full details
Amory B316Add this to your calendar
15 - 16 December 20149:00

"DARK DATA: ABSENCES, INTERVENTIONS AND DIGITAL WORLDS" - Organised by Sabina Leonelli, Gail Davies, Brian Rappert, Kaushik Sunder Rajan and Neal White

Programme attached Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
17 - 19 December 201412:30

"What is Data-Intensive Science?" - Dr Sabina Leonelli

This workshop is the first event in the project DATA_SCIENCE (www.datastudies.eu ). It brings together the key participants in the project, with the aim to start long-term discussions around what constitutes data-intensive science, compare the ways in which different scholars and fields conceptualise and enact data practices, and agree on the set-up, methods and themes to be pursued by the project team and collaborators over the next four years. Speakers will be presenting the specific sciences that they are researching, the methods that they use and the themes that they are interested in exploring in the future. The workshop is meant to provide an informal occasion for discussion, and will therefore not showcase full papers except from the keynote lecture provided by Professor Luciano Floridi, which will target the intersections between philosophy of science and philosophy of information in ways that will stimulate data-related discussions. Full details
Jurys Inn, Western Way, ExeterAdd this to your calendar
7 January 201515:00

Dr. Rachel Jarvie, Exeter. '''Maternal Diabesity: The Disconnect between Policy/Practice and the Material Realities of Women's Lives'

SPA Research seminar: Abstract: There is increasing prevalence of ‘maternal obesity’, Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) and Type Two Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) in pregnancy. Increasing prevalence of diabetes in pregnancy is widely attributed to dramatically increasing levels of ‘obesity’ in women of childbearing age. Co-existing ‘maternal obesity’ and GDM/T2DM, or ‘maternal diabesity’, complicates increasing numbers of pregnancies in the UK. These ‘conditions’ are associated with adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Recent research indicates an ‘obese’/diabetic ‘intrauterine milieu’ may epigenetically programme the fetus to obesity/diabetes in later life. This is considered to be an important factor in the perpetuation of the ‘diabesity epidemic’. Biomedical/policy discourses emphasise the necessity for women to effect lifestyle changes in order for this public health issue to be ameliorated. Epidemiological data shows clear associations between these medical ‘conditions’ and lower socio-economic status/deprivation. However, this is under-discussed in the literature. I carried out a qualitative longitudinal study of 30 women with ‘maternal diabesity’. Women were predominantly of low socio-economic status, with some experiencing considerable material deprivation. In this talk I draw upon Bourdieusian conceptual tools: the habitus and ‘distance from necessity’, to discuss the disjuncture between policy/practice and the material realities of women’s everyday lives. Full details
Building OneAdd this to your calendar
14 January 201515:00

"The changing natures of natural medicines, as seen by regulatory scientists" - Dr Jennifer Cuffe (University of Exeter)

Nature, as Raymond Williams remarked, “is perhaps the most complex word in the language” (1976). Nevertheless, the word (as a qualifier) was used, in Canada, to create a new legal category of commodified medicines: that of ‘natural health products.’ With this change in law, regulatory scientists were mandated to segregate out medicines that would be regulated as natural health products, from those that would continue to be regulated as drugs. Needless to say, which medicines should be considered natural for the purposes of regulation was not always self-evident. This paper takes an anthropological and historical approach to the question of how Canadian regulatory scientists have approached the “nature” in drugs. It takes an anthropological approach by describing how regulatory scientists approached their task of segregating out natural medicines when the new regulations were enacted. It then provides an overview of how plant-based medicines have been marketed and regulated through the twentieth century, to explain how the regulators were able to approach their classificatory task as they did. I argue that the current safety of natural health products is to some extent a self-fulfilling prophecy, because government officials, formally and informally, have progressively made the idea of a risky natural health product (according to regulatory practice) into an oxymoron since the early 1900s. Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
21 January 201515:00

Prof. XiaoWei, Tsinghua University, Beijing. Title tbc

SPA Research Seminar Full details
Building OneAdd this to your calendar
28 January 201515:00

Prof John Dupre

Egenis seminar Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
4 February 201515:00

Prof. Ilana Loewy, Paris. title tbc

SPA Research Seminar Full details
Building OneAdd this to your calendar
11 February 201515:00

Dr Ann Kelly

Egenis seminar Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
18 February 201515:00

"Ethical harmonization across space: logistic and regulatory issues in implementing a multi-national clinical trial" Prof Christine Hauskeller and Dr Nicole-Kerstin Baur, University of Exeter

In this talk we report findings from an empirical investigation of the process in which a stem cell clinical trial is being implemented across 10 European countries. As part of a clinical trial team, we had the unique opportunity to study implementation – including its events and problems - while it happened. Obstacles for swift patient recruitment across clinical sites arose for a variety of reasons, but most are related to the minute standardization of practice which is the basis for the scientific approach in medicine that identifies clinical trials as ultimate evidence for clinical efficacy. We identified differences in resource management and in locally entrenched daily routines of patient care, but also in the practical implementation of regulations and insurance requirements, for example, which as such relate back to specific understandings of best practice in clinical care. Our findings show that the policies developed to harmonise medical practice and clinical trials in Europe can lead to serious delays before patient recruitment even starts. We especially focus on problems with the logistics and technological requirements following European Medicines Agency (EMA) regulations and the effects of the Voluntary Harmonisation Procedure (VHP), a protocol aimed at simplifying multinational ethics approval of general agreements which depend on both trust and coherence in other policies. Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
25 February 201515:00

Dr Stephan Guttinger

Egenis seminar Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
4 March 201515:00

“Causation, Convention and Individuation” - Dr Amber Carpenter (University of York)

This paper will consider two rival accounts of the relationship between causation and individuation. On both accounts, familiar individual things have a reality relative to purposes and conventions, making our everyday metaphysical presumptions matters of moral import. On one view, there are pre-conventional individuals which cause, and thus warrant, our practices of everyday individuation. On the other view, there are no such realities, and causation is itself merely conventional. Through contrasting the two views, we will assess the viability of tying individuation to causation, exploring the theoretic advantages and principle pitfalls. Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
11 March 201515:00

Dr. Mattia Galotti, University of London, Exeter PhD

SPA Research Seminar Full details
Building OneAdd this to your calendar
18 March 201515:00

"Stress and the Midlife Crisis" - Prof Mark Jackson

Egenis seminar Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
29 April 201515:00

Dr Daniele Carrieri

Egenis seminar Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
6 May 201515:00

Prof. Rob Hagendijk, Amsterdam. Title tbc

SPA Research Seminar Full details
Building OneAdd this to your calendar
13 May 201515:00

Prf Steve Hinchliffe

Egenis seminar Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
20 May 201515:00

"Triebhaftes Fähigsein – Heidegger’s crypto-vitalist concept of organism" Dr Anne Sophie Spann (University of Exeter)

In his early lecture “The fundamental concepts of metaphysics” (1929/30), Heidegger develops a concept of organism which stresses the functional wholeness of organisms and the ontological priority and primitiveness of life. His arguments thereby heavily rely on ideas and experiments of Uexküll and Driesch. Nevertheless Heidegger denies being a vitalist. Instead, his concept of organism is meant to be an alternative not only to the mechanistic paradigm but also to contemporary versions of vitalism. In my talk, I want to explore whether Heidegger is right in telling us this. In particular, the key notion of the organism’s driven capacity (‘triebhaftes Fähigsein’) might make us worry about whether the difference to vitalism is actually as deep as Heidegger suggests. Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
3 June 201515:00

Dr. Sam Liao, Singapore/Leeds

SPA Research Seminar Full details
Amory B315Add this to your calendar
10 June 201515:00

"Data sharing in low resource settings: a capabilities approach." - Dr Louise Bezuidenhout

Egenis seminar Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
17 June 201515:00

Dr Ginny Russell

Egenis seminar Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar