Events

Listed below are forthcoming events in Sociology, Philosophy and Anthropology.

See also all events in the College of Social Sciences and International Studies.

Any college staff or postgraduates may always attend. Anyone else should contact the department or the centre in question.

WhenDescriptionLocationAdd to your calendar
20 February 2018

Q-Step: Longitudinal Data Analysis

In this workshop you will learn about the principles of longitudinal data analysis, when it should be used and the advantages and disadvantages of longitudinal methods. You will also be introduced to event history analysis and learn how to construct a person-year data file. Finally, you will learn to run common hazard models and create a survival curve. The workshop will be taught using STATA software with examples from the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS). Please note that a prior experience with regression analysis is required. Full details
Old Library PC Cluster (Level -1) Add this to your calendar
26 February 2018

POSTPONED - Dr Sarah Chaney (Queen Mary University of London)

To be re-scheduled. Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
27 February 2018

Q-Step : Network Analysis

The workshop provides an introduction for beginners to Social Network Analysis. It gives an overview of key concepts needed to design research that looks at social relations (networks) that connect individual units (actors), so that students can apply social network analysis to their own research. The workshop focuses on the description and visualisation of social network data, looking at structural properties of a network, as well as ideas of centrality in the network. To understand the SNA perspective, practical examples are given from academic literature, illustrative graphics from the media, and source material visualised through R. Experience in R is expected although not required. We will use a combination of slides and R code exercise. Full details
Old Library Research Seminar Room A/B20 Add this to your calendar
1 March 2018

Careers in lobbying and advocacy with Danny Kushlick (Transform Drug Policy Foundation)

Join Danny Kushlick (Founder and Head of External Affairs at Transform Drug Policy Foundation) for a workshop focusing on a career in lobbying and advocacy. Transform is a charitable think tank that campaigns for the legal regulation of drugs both in the UK and internationally. Transform aims to educate and inspire policymakers to explore and implement the effective legal regulation of drug markets. Danny will speak about his diverse career and experiences, give an in-depth look into the work of organisations such as Transform, and give his tips on being successful in the industry. There will be a Q&A after the talk, and a drinks reception where you will have the chance to speak to Danny further. Danny Kushlick bio: Danny is the founder of Transform Drug Policy Foundation, which he started in 1996, after working in a variety of jobs in the drugs field. It was his clients' experience that led him to the understanding that prohibition is a social policy catastrophe. He worked for Bristol Drugs Project, the Big Issue Foundation, Bath Area Drugs Advisory Service and the National Association for the Care and Resettlement of Offenders (NACRO). He is now an internationally recognised commentator on drug and drug policy issues, with a unique combination of personal experience and broad, global view. Please ensure that you arrive promptly for the start of this event and that you have your University ID card (UniCard) with you. Your attendance at this appointment/event will be recorded. If you are recorded as absent your ability to book further events and appointments may be temporarily revoked. If you are unable to attend, please cancel your booking as soon as possible. Please see attendance policy at http://www.exeter.ac.uk/careers/exeter/aboutus/policies/. Full details
Amory C417Add this to your calendar
5 March 2018

Lorna Finlayson (University of Essex) “Madness, present and pervasive: Laingian social pathology and the spectre of organicism”

SPA Seminar series. Full details
Amory C417Add this to your calendar
6 March 2018

Q-Step : Agent-based modeling

Though models sit at the centre of lines of social inquiry as diverse as game theory, statistical analysis, qualitative analysis, and political philosophy, all involve an attempt to describe core elements of the world in a way that helps us to understand, value, and predict that world. With Agent Based Models, computer simulations of the behaviours of many agents work deductively from simplified assumptions to create dynamic interactions that can be examined over a range of conditions to make inductive arguments about the nature of the world. In this generative reasoning approach, agents with very simple micromotives can lead to complex adaptive systems in which qualitatively different macrobehaviours emerge. How do very simple assumptions about drivers, city dwellers, and voters lead to complex emergent phenomena like traffic jams, housing segregation, and party realignment? In this lecture, I’ll introduce answers to these questions by building models of these problems and highlight tools you can use to develop your own agent based models. Full details
Old Library Research Seminar Room A/B20 Add this to your calendar
7 March 2018

"Animals and the Shaping of Modern Medicine" Dr Angela Cassidy (University of Exeter)

Book Launch event. Egenis, CRPR (Centre for Rural Policy Research) and the Wellcome Centre for Cultures and Environments of Health will be co-hosting a book launch event for “Animals and the Shaping of Modern Medicine: One Health and its Histories” co-authored by Abigail Woods (King’s College London), Michael Bresalier (Swansea University), Angela Cassidy (University of Exeter, CRPR/Egenis) and Rachel Mason Dentinger (University of Utah). Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
8 March 2018

Q-Step: Text Analysis - Python

tbc. Full details
Building:One Syndicate Room B Add this to your calendar
13 March 2018

Q-Step : Multilevel modeling

In this tutorial, we introduce multilevel models as extensions of regression-type models suited to analyse hierarchical or nested data, such as children's SATs test scores nested within classes or schools, individual survey responses nested within interviewers, or, potentially, any measure taken repeatedly over time. Full details
Old Library Research Seminar Room A/B20Add this to your calendar
21 - 23 March 2018

Process Biology: Final Conference of the ERC Project ‘A Process Ontology for Contemporary Biology’ Prof John Dupre

The ERC-funded project ‘A Process Ontology for Contemporary Biology’ (2013-2018) has sought to rethink central issues in the philosophy of biology by elaborating an ontology for biology that takes full account of the processual nature of living systems. The goal has been to develop a concept of process adequate for addressing the multiple levels of interacting processes at different time scales characteristic of living systems. All biological entities can be analysed as stabilised processes relative to an appropriate time scale, and this conception provides a better understanding of familiar biological pluralisms (about genes, organisms, species, etc..) in terms of different ways in which distinct scientific practices intersect with biological processes. A process perspective has been used to shed light on a number of traditional philosophical problems, including individuation, classification, persistence, explanation, essentialism, and reductionism. It has also addressed the consequences of a process perspective for particular areas of contemporary biological and biomedical research. This final conference will present the main findings of the project and explore the broader consequences of a process ontology for biology, as well as suggest further avenues of future research in the philosophy of biology and metaphysics. Full details
The Royal Institution of Great Britain, LondonAdd this to your calendar
26 March 2018

"Turning Science into Legal Data: Where is the Invention in Patent Law?" Hyo Yoon Kang (University of Kent)

Egenis seminar series. This talk will explore the implications of patent law's digitisation on the understanding of scientific and technological inventions. Patent law is becoming increasingly datafied, both in terms of its internal workings as well as its social information, through interlinked databases. The result is that a patented invention, a scientific and/or technological artefact, is rendered into legal data. I probe the place of scientific knowledge in such a setting and show that the datafication of science and law results in different kind of calculability, namely a financial one. Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar