Events

Listed below are forthcoming events in Sociology, Philosophy and Anthropology.

See also all events in the College of Social Sciences and International Studies.

Any college staff or postgraduates may always attend. Anyone else should contact the department or the centre in question.

WhenTimeDescriptionLocationAdd to Calendar
4 February 201515:00

Prof. Ilana Loewy, Paris. Snowball effects of prenatal diagnosis: sex chromosomes anomalies and deletions

SPA Research Seminar Full details
Building OneAdd this to your calendar
11 February 2015

Dr Ann Kelly (University of Exeter)

Postponed until Wednesday 25th March 2015 Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
16 February 201513:30

"Understanding in Scientific Practice: Reasoning, Cognition, Mechanisms" organised by Prof Sabina Leonelli & Dr Adam Toon (University of Exeter)

The workshop is funded by the European Research Council, through the project DATA_SCIENCE. No advance registration needed. For information, contact the workshop organisers: Sabina Leonelli (s.leonelli@exeter.ac.uk) and Adam Toon (a.toon@exeter.ac.uk). Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
18 February 201515:00

"Ethical harmonization across space: logistic and regulatory issues in implementing a multi-national clinical trial" Prof Christine Hauskeller and Dr Nicole-Kerstin Baur, University of Exeter

In this talk we report findings from an empirical investigation of the process in which a stem cell clinical trial is being implemented across 10 European countries. As part of a clinical trial team, we had the unique opportunity to study implementation – including its events and problems - while it happened. Obstacles for swift patient recruitment across clinical sites arose for a variety of reasons, but most are related to the minute standardization of practice which is the basis for the scientific approach in medicine that identifies clinical trials as ultimate evidence for clinical efficacy. We identified differences in resource management and in locally entrenched daily routines of patient care, but also in the practical implementation of regulations and insurance requirements, for example, which as such relate back to specific understandings of best practice in clinical care. Our findings show that the policies developed to harmonise medical practice and clinical trials in Europe can lead to serious delays before patient recruitment even starts. We especially focus on problems with the logistics and technological requirements following European Medicines Agency (EMA) regulations and the effects of the Voluntary Harmonisation Procedure (VHP), a protocol aimed at simplifying multinational ethics approval of general agreements which depend on both trust and coherence in other policies. Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
25 February 201515:00

Dr Stephan Guttinger

Egenis seminar Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
4 March 201515:00

“Causation, Convention and Individuation” - Dr Amber Carpenter (University of York)

This paper will consider two rival accounts of the relationship between causation and individuation. On both accounts, familiar individual things have a reality relative to purposes and conventions, making our everyday metaphysical presumptions matters of moral import. On one view, there are pre-conventional individuals which cause, and thus warrant, our practices of everyday individuation. On the other view, there are no such realities, and causation is itself merely conventional. Through contrasting the two views, we will assess the viability of tying individuation to causation, exploring the theoretic advantages and principle pitfalls. Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
11 March 201515:00

Dr. Mattia Galotti, University of London, Exeter PhD

SPA Research Seminar Full details
Building OneAdd this to your calendar
18 March 201515:00

"Stress and the Midlife Crisis" - Prof Mark Jackson

Egenis seminar Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
25 March 201515:00

"The Wild-Indoors: The Room Spaces of Scientific Inquiry” - Dr Ann Kelly (University of Exeter)

The paper examines three locations where scientists engage in the experimental manipulation of mosquitoes: the insectary, the semi-field station, and the outdoors. Scientific and regulatory discourses (and, often, science studies scholarship) place these locations in a linear trajectory of ever-diminishing containment and ever-greater approximation to the real world. Instead, we propose to treat each of these sites as creating a distinct mode of interiority, a particular room-space (Clark 2013). It is through the fabrication of a sense of proximity that researchers substantiate their observations and can take in – and be taken in by – the world of mosquitoes. Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
29 April 201515:00

Dr Daniele Carrieri

Egenis seminar Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
6 May 201515:00

Prof. Rob Hagendijk, Amsterdam. Title tbc

SPA Research Seminar Full details
Building OneAdd this to your calendar
13 May 201515:00

"Pathogenicities and the spatialities of disease situations" - Prof Steve Hinchliffe (University of Exeter)

What would a geography of emerging infectious diseases look like? A familiar answer to this question is based on a map or surface upon and across which diseases emerge and travel. The language is one of hotspots and viral traffic. It’s a contagionist as well as topographical disease imagination. In this paper I want to trace out alternatives that are based on what can be called a disease situation. In social theory, situations borrow from what might be called site ontologies. Situations link sites, but in ways that are non-coherent, and certainly fall short of any free-floating whole or emergent property. Situations are, I will argue, spatially and materially composite; they are, after Stengers, ecologies of practices that may well be eventful. To illustrate, I engage with a particular disease situation called avian flu. The aim is to demonstrate the spatial multiplicity that is involved when the object of concern flips between a pathogen and pathogenicity. The latter is a configurational issue, and invites a range of topological sensibilities. These sensibilities in turn seem to invite a form of abductive logic, a tacking back and forth between evidence and speculation. Whether this abductive logic reproduces a security neurosis or opens up new ways of addressing the emergence of disease emergencies is, I argue, an empirical question and requires engaging with disease events as reconfigured situations. Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
20 May 201515:00

"Triebhaftes Fähigsein – Heidegger’s crypto-vitalist concept of organism" Dr Anne Sophie Spann (University of Exeter)

In his early lecture “The fundamental concepts of metaphysics” (1929/30), Heidegger develops a concept of organism which stresses the functional wholeness of organisms and the ontological priority and primitiveness of life. His arguments thereby heavily rely on ideas and experiments of Uexküll and Driesch. Nevertheless Heidegger denies being a vitalist. Instead, his concept of organism is meant to be an alternative not only to the mechanistic paradigm but also to contemporary versions of vitalism. In my talk, I want to explore whether Heidegger is right in telling us this. In particular, the key notion of the organism’s driven capacity (‘triebhaftes Fähigsein’) might make us worry about whether the difference to vitalism is actually as deep as Heidegger suggests. Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
27 May 201515:00

John Pemberton

Egenis Seminar Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
3 June 201515:00

Dr. Sam Liao, Singapore/Leeds

SPA Research Seminar Full details
Amory B316Add this to your calendar
10 June 201515:00

"Data sharing in low resource settings: a capabilities approach." - Dr Louise Bezuidenhout

Egenis seminar Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
17 June 201515:00

Dr Ginny Russell

Egenis seminar Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar