Events

Listed below are forthcoming events in Sociology, Philosophy and Anthropology.

See also all events in the College of Social Sciences and International Studies.

Any college staff or postgraduates may always attend. Anyone else should contact the department or the centre in question.

WhenTimeDescriptionLocationAdd to Calendar
8 February 201615:30

"Epistemological Lessons from the Automation of Science" Prof Alexander Bird (University of Bristol)

Science is increasingly automated. Automatic weather stations and satellites have for some time collected raw data which is supplied directly to computers for analysis, whereupon weather maps are published on the web while the analysed results are also fed into meteorological and climate models. DNA sequencing, once a lengthy and expensive process involving considerable human input, is now almost entirely automated, where automation includes both the bio-chemical intervention with a sample and also the statistical analysis of the results of the biochemical assay. In this paper I focus on two sets of questions: 1. How should we understand `observation' in automated science? I argue for a functional rather than aetiological notion of observation. 2. What is scientific knowledge? I argue for a social conception of knowledge, where the `social' includes scientific infrastructure as well as scientists. Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
9 February 201618:15

Professor Michael Hauskeller Inaugural Lecture "Asking the right questions: On being a Philosopher and Ethicist"

Hardly a month goes by without the announcement of yet another significant technological innovation. So much has changed during the past three decades, it is almost impossible to predict with any degree of certainty what we will be able to accomplish and what our world will look like a decade or two ahead. Anything seems possible. This makes it more pressing than ever to figure out what we actually want and what kind of life we should strive for. This talk looks into some of the challenges we face today and tries to identify the role philosophy and especially philosophical ethics must play in a world so rapidly changing as ours. Click here for Professor Michael Hauskeller profile. If you wish to attend the lecture and drinks reception please email: ssis-events@exeter.ac.uk Full details
Streatham Court Old C Add this to your calendar
15 February 201615:00

Christoph Rehmann-Sutter (University of Lübeck) “Livingness: A Husserlian Approach”

SPA Research seminar Full details
Amory B316Add this to your calendar
22 February 201615:30

"Names and Numbers: “Data” in Classical Natural History, 1758–1859" Dr Staffan Müller-Wille (University of Exeter)

According to a famous formula going back to Immanuel Kant, the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries saw the transition from natural history to the history of nature. This paper will analyze changes in the institutions, social relations, and media of natural history that underwrote this epochal change. Focusing on the many posthumous re-editions, translations, and adaptations of Carl Linnaeus’s taxonomic works that began to appear throughout Europe after publication of the tenth edition of his Systema naturae (1758), I will then argue that the practices of Linnaean nomenclature and classification organized and enhanced the flows of data—a term already used by naturalists of the period—among individual naturalists and natural history institutions in new ways. Species became units that could be “inserted” into collections and publications, re-shuffled and exchanged, kept track of in lists and catalogues, and counted and distributed in ever new ways. On two fronts—biogeography and the search for the “natural system”—this brought to the fore entirely new, quantitative relationships among organisms of diverse kind. By letting nature speak through „artificial“ means and media of early systematics, I argue, new powerful visions of an unruly nature emerged that became the object of early evolutionary theories. Classical natural history as an “information science” held the same potential for generating surprising insights, that is, as the experimentally generated data of today’s data-intensive sciences. Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
29 February 201615:00

Sophie-Grace Chappell (The Open University) “Thick Concepts and “Thick Actions”

SPA Research Seminar Full details
Amory B316Add this to your calendar
7 March 201615:30

"Parts, Wholes, Processes, and Rates: From Rigid to Dynamic Mechanisms" Jan Baedke (University of Bochum)

In the last ten years a number of authors of the new mechanistic philosophy have argued for conceptualizing the relations traced in causal-mechanistic explanations in the biosciences by means of the idea of compositional constitution. In other words, ‘vertical’ relations across levels of organization in mechanisms exhibit constitution and inter-level parthood. For many ‘new mechanists’ this means that changes in the causal properties of parts constitutively (not causally) make a difference in the properties of wholes. This paper show that (i) this conceptualization of inter-level relations leads to a view of ‘rigid mechanisms’. (ii) It radically contradicts those mechanistic investigations in biology seeking to understand the vertical build-up of organisms diachronically and over time, respectively. Thus, (iii) a new view of ‘dynamic mechanisms’ is presented that is able to overcome this problem by conceptualizing vertical relations in mechanisms in a more dynamic manner. It is centered not on the concepts of constitution and parthood but on causal process and rate. Investigations in evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo) of the origin and change of levels of organization (i.e. evolutionary novelty and evolvability) will be reviewed to support these findings. Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
14 March 201615:00

“The Complex Relations Between Narrative and Suffering” Prof. Arthur Frank (University of Calgary)

SPA research seminar Full details
Amory B316Add this to your calendar
21 March 201615:30

Dr Julien Dugnoille (University of Exeter)

Egenis Seminar Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
11 April 201615:30

‘On Replicability in Clinical Trials’ - Prof David Teira (UNED, Madrid)

Egenis Seminar Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
21 - 22 April 201612:00

"Integrating Large Data into Plant Science: From Big Data to Discovery"

This workshop brings together prominent biologists, data scientists, database leads, publishers, representatives of learned societies and funders to discuss ways of harnessing and integrating large plant data to foster discovery. Over the last decade, data infrastructures such as cloud, grids and repositories have garnered attention and funding as crucial tools to facilitate the re-use of existing datasets. This is a complex task, and within plant science a variety of strategies have been developed to collect, combine and mine research data for new purposes. This workshop aims to review these strategies, identify examples of best practices and successful re-use both within and beyond plant science, and discuss both technical and institutional conditions for effective data mining. Full details
Dartington Hall, Totnes, DevonAdd this to your calendar
25 April 201615:30

Tim Lewens (University of Cambridge)

Egenis Seminar Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
16 May 201615:00

“Troubling Genealogies: Conceptualizing Race, Belonging and Political Subjectivity in South Africa” Katharina Schramm (Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg)

SPA Research seminar Full details
Amory B316Add this to your calendar
23 May 201615:30

Prof Sang-Wook Yi (Hanyang University, Seoul / University of Cambridge)

Egenis Seminar Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
6 June 201615:30

Dr Niccolo Tempini (University of Exeter)

Egenis Seminar Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
20 June 201615:30

Postponed until Autumn 2016, Date to be confirmed. Niels Güttler (ETH Zurich, Switzerland)

Egenis Seminar Full details
Byrne HouseAdd this to your calendar
7 - 8 July 2016

Moral Enhancement: The Annual Royal Institute of Philosophy Conference 2016

The annual Royal Institute of Philosophy Conference is taking place this year at the University of Exeter, with the topic of moral enhancement. Full details
Reed HallAdd this to your calendar