Decision to replace exams with predicted grades during coronavirus has left pupils feeling “powerless” survey shows

The decision to replace GCSE and A-level exams with predicted grades this summer has left pupils feeling “powerless” and “overwhelmingly” concerned with their grades, a major survey shows.

Public in France and Germany support a European military, security and defence policy, survey shows

People in France and Germany support building greater European military capacity and security and defence policy, a survey shows.

New study will investigate risks COVID-19 "immunity passports" pose to human rights

A new study will examine the risks coronavirus “immunity passports” pose to human rights as more countries begin to use technology to monitor health during the pandemic.

Guild Teaching Awards 2020

We’re delighted to announce the winners and college shortlist for the Teaching Awards 2020.

Giving people “digital literacy” tips can help them spot dubious information online, study shows

Giving people “digital literacy” tips can help them identify dubious information online, a new study shows.

Former Foreign Secretary heads panel discussion

David Miliband, president of the International Rescue Committee, is headlining an online panel discussion that is examining the impacts of COVID-19 on developing countries.

University of Exeter research leads to historic introduction of no fault divorce in England

Influential University of Exeter research has led to the historic introduction of no fault divorce in England and Wales.

Concerns for disadvantaged teenagers as activities to encourage them to apply to university disrupted during coronavirus lockdown, research shows

University staff working with prospective students are concerned about the prospects of those from disadvantaged homes as their work is disrupted or put on hold during the coronavirus lockdown, research shows.

Appetite for fast fashion goes out of style when people learn about impact of mass-produced clothing, study shows

Learning in groups how to make, mend and modify clothing reduces the appetite for fast fashion, a new study shows.

Innovative programme where children use their own voice to improve reading open for more participants

An innovative education programme which helps children improve their reading by using the sound of their own voice is open for more participants.

Disadvantaged pupils could be unfairly penalised by coronavirus predicted grades, expert warns

This year’s system of using predicted grades to award A-level and GCSE results should be closely monitored to ensure it doesn’t unfairly penalise disadvantaged pupils, a social mobility expert has warned.

Insurers should be willing to negotiate coronavirus claims to avoid courts being overwhelmed, study warns

Insurers should be open to negotiating coronavirus claims to avoid courts becoming overwhelmed with disputes, a new study warns.

Public relying on BBC news as source of information about coronavirus, analysis shows

News from the BBC about coronavirus has been shared significantly more on social media than articles from journalists in other organisations, new research suggests.

Efforts to speed up police digital forensic analysis must be more efficient, study shows

Efforts by police forces to speed up digital forensic analysis could lead to oversights in evidence gathering and interpretation, a new study warns.

Covid generation faces ‘dark age’ of low social mobility - young Britons at risk of long-term damage to future life prospects

The unprecedented economic and educational shocks of the Covid-19 pandemic could inflict long-term damage to young people’s prospects in life, a new study finds.

Student raises £10,000 for mental health charity by running five marathons in five days

A University of Exeter student has raised £10,000 for those affected by mental health issues during the coronavirus pandemic by running 131 miles in just five days.

Training bystanders to intervene will help to prevent domestic violence and abuse, study shows

Empowering people to intervene when they witness unacceptable behaviour can help to prevent domestic violence and abuse, a new study has found.

Early African Muslims had a halal – and cosmopolitan diet - discovery of thousands of ancient animal bones shows

Early Muslim communities in Africa ate a cosmopolitan diet as the region became a trading centre for luxury goods, the discovery of thousands of ancient animal bones has shown.

New study will show impact of coronavirus on Britain’s crucial food supply chains

The impact of coronavirus on Britain’s crucial food supply chains will be tracked as part of a new study which will show how the current crisis has affected the journey from farm to plate.

Video link weddings should be allowed to help the desperately ill during the coronavirus pandemic, expert recommends

Weddings via video link should be allowed for those desperately ill during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a leading marriage-law expert.

Games to bring laughter and help families during coronavirus lockdown

A University of Exeter expert has come up with games featuring dancing, storytelling, running and acting to help families struggling to think of new things to do at home during the coronavirus lockdown.

Voters across Europe perceive the EU as less democratic than it is, survey suggests

Large portions of voters across Europe misunderstand the workings of the European Union and think it is less democratic than it actually is, research suggests.

Public would obey major changes to antibiotic advice, research shows

The public would comply with major changes to medical advice – but would then be less likely to follow other new guidelines in the future, research shows.

Coronavirus has led to major change in attitudes about parental responsibility for children’s education, survey shows

School closures have led to a change in attitudes among parents about who should be responsible for their child’s education, a major new survey shows.

Covid lockdown could leave disadvantaged children with “learning loss” of six months, experts warn

School closures during the coronavirus lockdown could leave disadvantaged children with “learning loss” of up to six months, leading social mobility experts have warned.

University of Exeter expert elected to prestigious American Academy of Arts & Sciences

A University of Exeter expert has been elected to one of the world’s most prestigious academic organisations.

Exeter researchers secure prestigious national fellowships

Five leading researchers from across disciplines at the University of Exeter have received prestigious national fellowships, it has been announced.

CAIS launches blog on the global politics of COVID-19

Drs John Heathershaw and Brieg Powel lead the pandemipolitics.net initiative - a new blog where CAIS experts unpack the political dimension of the ongoing pandemic.

Experts to develop new ways of monitoring and tackling extreme right-wing online forums

University of Exeter experts will develop new ways to better monitor activity on extreme right-wing online forums linked with terrorism as part of a major new research project.

Exeter team receives a CREST award for research on far-right forums

Drs Stephane Baele, Lewys Brace and Travis Coan, based at Q-STEP and CAIS, conduct research on the far-right "Chan" forums.

Couples should work as a team and make plans for the future to ensure their relationship thrives during coronavirus lockdown, experts say

Couples trying to cope with the coronavirus lockdown should work as a team and make future plans to keep their relationship strong during the crisis, experts have said.

Parents can have their say on impact of school closures on families as part of major new research project

Parents can have their say on how their families are coping with the upheaval of school closures as part of a major new research project set up to track the impact of coronavirus.

Interactive product labels require new regulations, study warns

Artificial intelligence will be increasingly used on labels on food and other products in the future to make them interactive, and regulations should be reformed now so they take account of new innovations, a study warns.

“Blind over-reliance” on AI technology to manage international migration could lead to serious breaches of human rights, study warns

Over-reliance by countries on artificial intelligence to tackle international migration and manage future migration crisis could lead to serious breaches of human rights, a new study warns.

University of Exeter new partner in £2.8million ESRC investment in social science methods training

University of Exeter experts will help to train academics from throughout the UK in cutting-edge research methods as part of a major new national initiative.

Facebook “prominent gateway” to untrustworthy websites during 2016 US presidential election, study shows

Facebook was the most prominent gateway to untrustworthy websites during the 2016 US Presidential election, a new study shows.

Exeter subjects ranked amongst the world’s best, according to influential league table

Subjects across the Arts and Sciences at the University of Exeter have been recognised as being amongst the very best worldwide, in the latest influential global league table.

Male doctoral graduates more likely to have a full-time, permanent job than their female counterparts, study shows

Male doctoral graduates are more likely to get a permanent job compared to their female counterparts, a new study shows.

The Political Studies Association announces its new Chair and Vice Chair

Professor Claire Dunlop has been appointed as Vice Chair of Political Studies Association of the UK (PSA)

Professor Jane Elliott awarded CBE for services to social sciences

A University of Exeter sociologist who has had a leading role in managing longitudinal studies which give vital information about the wellbeing of the nation has been awarded CBE in the New Year’s Honours list.

It could take a century to hit the latest official university access targets

The Higher Education Policy Institute has published a new report on access to higher education which shows that, at the current rate of progress, it will take 96 years to hit the Office for Students’s targets for access to highly-selective universities.

Brexit positions drive voter attention at least as much as party loyalties, study shows

Voters find information from politicians more “interesting” if they have the same views on Brexit – even if they don’t represent the party they normally support, a study shows.

Higher education staff support new legal duty for universities to prevent and respond effectively to sexual violence and harassment, study shows

Higher education staff are in favour of new legal duties for universities to prevent and respond effectively to sexual violence and harassment on campus, according to a new study.

Experts find first archaeological evidence of Christianity in Bahrain

Experts have found the first archaeological evidence showing Christianity was practised in Bahrain, a discovery which sheds light on a missing part of the country’s history.

Social Sciences and the New Funding Landscape

Professor Alison Park CBE, FAcSS, Director of Research at ESRC, visits Social Sciences at Exeter.

Higher earning “elite” political lobbyists overstate their own achievements, study shows

“Elite”, high-earning political lobbyists are more likely to overstate their achievements, a new study shows.

Professor Schmitt recognized internationally

Exeter Law School’s Professor Mike Schmitt has recently received a number of prestigious appointments. 

Conservative Party divisions contributed to the failure of Brexit negotiations, new study shows

Divisions in the Conservative Party allowed the European Union to set the agenda during Brexit negotiations, a new study shows.

Both Remainers and Leavers willing to let MPs disrupt the constitution to get the Brexit they want, survey shows

With Brexit once again in limbo, new research shows that Remainers and Leavers are both willing to disrupt Britain’s unwritten constitution to get the Brexit outcome they want.

Non-Final Year Prize Celebration 2019

On 22nd October 2019, Exeter Law School held its inaugural Non-Final Year Prizes Celebration.

Henry VIII’s marital troubles may have influenced other splits, newly-discovered documents show

Newly-discovered documents show Henry VIII’s legendary marital troubles may have led to other copy-cat splits around the country.

Britain’s laws are harming businesses operating in space, experts warn

Britain’s laws are harming hi-tech companies who want to operate in the burgeoning space industry, experts have warned.

Religion now plays an “explicit and institutionalised” role in US foreign policy-making, new research shows

Faith is increasingly used to advance the interests and values of the United States around the world, according to a new book by Dr Gregorio Bettiza from the University of Exeter.

Professor Claire Dunlop conferred as a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences

A University of Exeter expert has been made a fellow of the prestigious Academy of Social Sciences for her research on regulatory design and policy evaluation.

Exeter Law School in Cornwall officially opens

On Friday 20 September 2019 we officially launched our Exeter Law School in Cornwall (Skol an Lagha Karesk). The event was attended by our first cohort of students as well as staff, local solicitors, barristers and members of the Cornwall Law Society.

Victims Commissioner launches pioneering football programme to tackle toxic locker room culture

Dame Vera Baird has praised a pioneering programme which trains football coaches to act as role models and intervene when they witness unacceptable locker room behaviour.

 

Voters expect much more from political parties who win decisive election victories

Voters expect much more from politicians when the media describes them as having won a decisive electoral victory, research shows.

Students to offer free legal support for community as part of new degree course

University of Exeter students will provide free legal support for those in need in their community as part of a new law degree in Cornwall.

New research warns incentives to plead guilty can undermine the right to a fair trial

New research suggests that the right to a fair trial can be undermined by benefits associated with pleading guilty, and that such benefits are putting pressure on vulnerable defendants to admit to crimes they did not commit.

Double success for Professor Sabina Leonelli

Professor Leonelli has been elected to the International Academy of Philosophy of Sciences and the European Philosophy of Science Association.

When should NHS contact patients over faulty genes?

The NHS and health services worldwide need to develop policies on when patients should be “re-contacted” about faulty genes, as the current lack of guidance creates a dilemma for health services, experts have warned.

Giving people a “digital identity” could leave them vulnerable to discrimination, experts warn

Global efforts to give millions of people missing key paper documents such as birth certificates a digital identity could leave them vulnerable to persecution or discrimination, a new study warns.

Learn how to avoid fast fashion at Cornish events this month

Experts working to help find ways to stop Britain’s fast fashion addiction will share their findings at a new exhibition touring Cornwall this month.

Energy price cap has "destroyed" competitive market for consumers, research shows

Introducing a price cap for energy bills has “destroyed” the UK’s competitive market for gas and electricity, new research warns.

Market competition sets tone for lower cost of UK mobile phone contracts, research shows

Healthy and competitive markets – and not stringent regulations – help dial back the cost of mobile phone contacts, according to new research.

Short films animated by autistic artists provides insight into talent that autism can bring

Autistic adults have created beautiful animations as part of a project that highlights their creativity and different ways of thinking.

New toolkit to provide guidance on international cyber law

International lawyers and cyber experts have worked together to give new guidance on how countries may respond to malicious cyber operations such as computer hacking aimed at interfering with foreign elections.

Leading social mobility expert awarded OBE

Britain’s first Professor of Social Mobility has been awarded OBE for his work helping schools and universities to improve the prospects of disadvantaged young people

University of Exeter Law School Celebrates new Partnership with Wuhan University

In May 2019, the University of Exeter’s School of Law and Wuhan University finalised a new Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to develop closer ties between our institutions.

New Directions in Agri-Environmental Governance - a workshop in Neuchâtel

On 28 and 29 May 2019, Professor Michael Winter OBE was one of the invited speakers at a workshop at the Institut d’Ethnologie in Neuchâtel, Switzerland.

The Search for Deliberative Democracy in Asia – Exeter Contribute to High Profile Conference

The University of Exeter was represented by Dr Catherine Owen, a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow, whose research compares the production of active citizenship in Russia and China

Guild Teaching Awards 2019

The College performed extremely well in the Guild Teaching Awards 2019.

Can listening instead of just looking change attitudes to how we experience a day out at the zoo?

What can we hear if we stop and listen to the zoo? Does this change our experience of the animals we visit? Which species and what aspects of their behaviour come to the fore and what do we learn as a result?

New electoral regulations must tackle “inequalities” caused by political advertising on Facebook

Regulators must find a way of monitoring and addressing the way political advertising on Facebook creates new types of inequalities for campaigners, experts have said.

Innovative degree helps future lawyers prepare for new technology and online courts

Students have the opportunity to study at a top university and global firm as part of a new course designed to prepare them for the growth in legal innovation and technology and how it will change the role of judges and lawyers as well as increase the potential for access to justice for litigants.

Michael Winter warns of the need to take care with the future of farming when designing new policies for post-Brexit rural land use

Government policies across the UK increasingly connect objectives for farming with the environment and broader natural capital approaches (e.g. 25 Year Environment Plan, Agriculture Bill). However, any discussion around natural capital and farming requires a farming system that improves or maintains natural capital against a backdrop of pressures such as environmental change, economic uncertainty and BREXIT.

Law in Cornwall team arrange exciting Grand Challenges activity for students on the Penryn Campus

Grand Challenges is a project week, from 10 to 14 June 2019, in which students work in interdisciplinary groups with other like-minded students to design innovative solutions to real-world challenges.

Exeter Cohort 5 Pathways to Law Students Graduate

26 students from 14 state schools and colleges from across the South West region graduated from the Pathways to Law programme

Social Sciences Alumni Return for Q&A and Networking with Exeter Scholars Students

A panel of alumni from the College of Social Sciences and International Studies attended an Exeter Scholars event, answering questions posed by Year 12 students on this prestigious programme, followed by a round table networking session.

Professor Richard Moorhead appointed as Exeter’s new Head of Law

The University of Exeter has appointed Professor Richard Moorhead as the new Head of Law starting in September 2019.

Autism brings qualities which help at home and at work, study shows

Autism enhances characteristics such as loyalty and focus which help those with the condition at work and in their relationships with others, experts have found.

University of Exeter students winners of national competition

A team of University of Exeter students has won a national competition which seeks new innovations for the insurance industry.

UK performers could face falling wages thanks to the gig economy, experts warn

The gig economy could drive down wages and de-professionalise the UK voice-over industry as jobs are increasingly advertised online, experts have warned.

Natural world and fantasy helps young children use sophisticated language, study shows

The natural world and fantasy helps young children use sophisticated words such as “slithering” and “abracadabra”, one of the largest studies to measure pupils’ language skills has found.

Exeter subjects ranked amongst world’s best

The University of Exeter’s science and humanities subjects have been ranked amongst the very best in the world, according to the latest influential global league table.

Nobel Peace Prize winner shares inspirational story of bringing democracy to Tunisia

Nobel Prize winner and influential African businesswoman Ouided Bouchamaoui spoke about her extraordinary role bringing democracy to Tunisia during a visit to the University of Exeter.

Controversial science critics who turn into believers can sway others, research shows

People who experience their own “Road to Damascus” moment over hotly-debated scientific issues can then become key advocates on the subject, new research has shown.

Students take part in a crisis simulation based on the board game Aftershock

Acting as the Government of Carana (based on Haiti), the Army, the UN and NGOs, teams worked together to respond to a natural disaster on the island.

Million pound grant for researchers working to solve social and economic challenges

University of Exeter researchers have been given a £1.1m grant to help improve people’s lives by working in partnership to solve pressing social and economic challenges.

EU funding failed to win hearts and minds and prevent Brexit vote

People in one of the poorest parts of the UK voted for Brexit despite being given billions of pounds of EU cash because they don’t feel the funding improved their lives, according to a new report.

Almost half of us mistakenly believe that common law marriage exists

Almost half of people in England and Wales mistakenly believe that unmarried couples who live together have a common law marriage and enjoy the same rights as couples that are legally married.